Canadian Patents Database / Patent 2327580 Summary

Third-party information liability

Some of the information on this Web page has been provided by external sources. The Government of Canada is not responsible for the accuracy, reliability or currency of the information supplied by external sources. Users wishing to rely upon this information should consult directly with the source of the information. Content provided by external sources is not subject to official languages, privacy and accessibility requirements.

Claims and Abstract availability

Any discrepancies in the text and image of the Claims and Abstract are due to differing posting times. Text of the Claims and Abstract are posted:

  • At the time the application is open to public inspection;
  • At the time of issue of the patent (grant).
(12) Patent: (11) CA 2327580
(54) English Title: IDENTIFICATION CONFIRMATION SYSTEM
(54) French Title: SYSTEME DE CONFIRMATION D'IDENTIFICATION
(51) International Patent Classification (IPC):
  • G07C 11/00 (2006.01)
  • G06K 9/00 (2006.01)
  • G07F 7/00 (2006.01)
  • G06F 21/00 (2006.01)
(72) Inventors :
  • BLACK, GERALD R. (United States of America)
(73) Owners :
  • BLACK, GERALD R. (United States of America)
(71) Applicants :
  • BLACK, GERALD R. (United States of America)
(74) Agent: CASSAN MACLEAN IP AGENCY INC.
(45) Issued: 2009-01-27
(86) PCT Filing Date: 1999-04-07
(87) PCT Publication Date: 1999-10-14
Examination requested: 2003-12-03
(30) Availability of licence: N/A
(30) Language of filing: English

(30) Application Priority Data:
Application No. Country/Territory Date
60/080,962 United States of America 1998-04-07
60/088,498 United States of America 1998-06-08
60/109,511 United States of America 1998-11-23

English Abstract





A stylus with biometric sensors captures a wide variety of biometrics while
the pen is being used. The stylus is the centerpiece of
a system to enable conversion from a card-based commercial transaction system
to a cardless commercial transaction system. The stylus
senses the prints of the index finger and thumb along with other properties,
while the customer uses the stylus to sign his name. In signature
verification systems currently in use, pen-like systems are used, but prints
are not being measured. The stylus enables the conversion at
point-of-sale terminals when used to verify signatures, and in closed
environments where house cards are issued for a limited purpose
or within a limited area. Initially, the stylus will replace existing pen-like
systems for signature verification. Once used for signature
verficiation, the credit card becomes optional. Applicants can also use the
stylus to participate in government programs (such as subsidies,
voter registration, and driver's licenses).


French Abstract

La présente invention concerne un crayon à capteurs biométriques qui permet d'enregistrer un grand nombre de caractéristiques biométriques. Ce crayon constitue l'élément central d'un dispositif qui rend possible le passage d'un système de transactions commerciales à cartes en un système de transactions commerciales sans cartes. Utilisé pour signer, ce crayon enregistre, outre diverses caractéristiques, les empreintes de l'index et du pouce de l'intéressé. Les systèmes de vérification de signature utilisés à l'heure actuelle font certes appel à des crayons, mais sans relevé des empreintes digitales. Ce crayon peut se substituer aux cartes dans les terminaux de vente à des fins de vérification de la signature, dans des environnements clos dans lesquels des cartes remplissent une fonction bien précise, ou bien encore à l'intérieur d'une zone limitée. Au départ, ce crayon remplacera des systèmes à crayon existants pour la vérification de la signature. Une fois la signature authentifiée, l'emploi de cartes devient facultatif. Ce crayon peut également servir de moyen d'accès à certains services publics (subsides, inscription sur les rôles électoraux, permis de conduire, etc.).


Note: Claims are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.




WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:



1. A stylus for use as an identity verification device, the stylus being
coupled to a
processor, comprising: a stylus body; and, a sensor coupled to and being
located on or within
the stylus body, the sensor being adapted to capture a thumbprint of a user as
a user thumb
touches the sensor coupled to the stylus body,

whereby a comparison of a user thumbprint image to a first reference
thumbprint
image are used to verify user identity; and
whereby user verification is enabled upon a match of the user thumbprint image
and
the first reference thumbprint image.


2. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sensor is coupled to the
processor, the
processor being adapted to compare the captured thumbprint with a reference
thumbprint to
confirm user identity.


3. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sensor is coupled to the
processor, the
processor being adapted to compare the captured thumbprint with a plurality of
reference
thumbprints in search of a match.


4. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the processor is contained
within the stylus
body.


5. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sensor is a digital sensor.


6. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, including a memory device coupled to the
sensor for
storing the captured thumbprint.


7. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sensor is adapted to capture
a second
print.



-35-




8. A stylus, as set forth in claim 7, wherein the sensor is adapted to capture
the
thumbprint and the second print of the user at the same time.


9. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, including a second sensor coupled to the
stylus body,
the second sensor being adapted to capture a second print.


10. A stylus, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sensor is located partially
within and
partially outside of the stylus body.


11. An identity verification device, comprising: a stylus having a body; a
sensor coupled
to and being located on or within the body, the sensor being adapted to
capture a thumbprint
of a user as a user thumb touches the stylus body; a memory device for storing
at least one
reference print; and, a processor coupled to the sensor and the memory device,
the processor
being adapted to receive the captured thumbprint, the processor being adapted
to compare
the captured thumbprint with the at least one reference print.


12. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
processor is
adapted to compare the captured thumbprint with the reference print to confirm
the user
identity.


13. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
processor is
adapted to compare the captured thumbprint with a plurality of reference
prints in search of
a match.


14. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
processor is
contained within the stylus body.


15. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
processor is
contained within an external system and wherein the stylus is in digital
communication with
the external system.



-36-




16. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
sensor is a digital
sensor.


17. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
memory device
is adapted to store the captured thumbprint.


18. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
sensor is adapted
to capture a second print.


19. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 18, wherein the
sensor is adapted
to capture the thumbprint and the second print of the user at the same time.


20. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, including a
second sensor
coupled to the body, the second senor being adapted to capture a second print.


21. An identity verification device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the
stylus is a pen
and includes an ink tube.


22. A device, as set forth in claim 11, wherein the sensor is located
partially within and
outside of the stylus body.


23. A stylus, comprising: a stylus body; a sensor coupled to and being located
on or
within the stylus body, the sensor being adapted to capture a fingerprint of a
user as the user
grasps the stylus; a memory device within the stylus body and being adapted to
store at least
one reference fingerprint; and, a processor within the stylus body and being
coupled to the
sensor and the memory device, the processor being adapted to receive the
captured
fingerprint, the processor being adapted to compare the captured fingerprint
with the at least
one reference fingerprint.


24. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, wherein the processor is adapted to
compare the



-37-




captured fingerprint with the at least one reference print to confirm user
identity.


25. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, wherein the processor is adapted to
compare the
captured fingerprint with a plurality of reference prints in search of a
match.


26. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, wherein the sensor is a digital
sensor.


27. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, wherein the sensor is adapted to
capture a second
print.


28. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, including a second sensor coupled to
the body, the
second sensor being adapted to capture a second print.


29. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, wherein the stylus is a pen and
includes an ink tube.

30. A stylus, as set forth in claim 23, wherein the sensor is located
partially within and
partially outside of the stylus body.


31. A stylus, comprising: a stylus body; a sensor coupled to and being located
on or
within the stylus body, the sensor being adapted to capture a fingerprint of a
user as a user
finger touches the stylus body; a memory device within the stylus body, the
memory device
being adapted to store at least one reference fingerprint; and, a processor
within the stylus
body and being coupled to the sensor, the processor being coupled to the
memory device, the
processor being adapted to receive the captured fingerprint, the processor
being adapted to
store the captured fingerprint within the memory device, and the processor
being adapted to
compare the captured fingerprint with the at least one reference fingerprint.


32. A stylus, as set forth in claim 31, wherein the processor is adapted to
compare the
captured fingerprint with the at least one reference print to confirm user
identity.


33. A stylus, as set forth in claim 31, wherein the processor is adapted to
compare the



-38-




captured fingerprint with a plurality of reference prints in search of a
match.

34. A stylus, as set forth in claim 31, wherein the sensor is a digital
sensor.


35. A stylus, as set forth in claim 31, wherein the sensor is located
partially within and
partially outside of the stylus body.


36. A stylus for use as an identity verification device, the stylus being
coupled to a
processor, comprising a stylus body having a sensor, the sensor being adapted
to capture a
thumbprint of a user as a user thumb touches the sensor coupled to the stylus
body,
whereby a comparison of a user thumbprint image to a first reference
thumbprint
image are used to verify user identity; and
whereby user verification is enabled upon a match of the user thumbprint image
and
the first reference thumbprint image.



-39-

Note: Descriptions are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.


CA 02327580 2008-02-29
IDENTIFICATION CONFIRMATION SYSTEM
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates generally to a system for confuming the identification
of the identity of
a person in a transaction. using biometric identification without resorting to
credit or debit
type cards and, more particularly, to a device and method for replacing crcdit
cards, debit
cards, house cards, and check cards as are currently being used.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Credit cards were originally introduced to replace charge-a-plates. Plastic
charge cards, debit
cards, ATM cards, stored value cards are already outdated and will soon be
phased out. It's
not uncommon for people to carry more than eight cards in their wallets. The
cards must be
replaced every few years. and the cards may become damaged with frequent
usage. In
addition, consumer fraud and card counterfeiting are on the rise. The cards
can be easily lost
or stolen, signatures can be easily forged and PIN's can be readily determined
by criminals.
Hence, while plastic cards are easier to carry than money. they are almost as
negotiable as
money to sophisticated criminals.

Fingerprints offer an infallible means of personal identification. The use of
fingerprints for
identification dates back many decades. but gained wide acceptance about 100
years ago.
Fingerprints are the biometric that form the basis of all worldwide
identification.
Fingerprints don't change with time while other physical characteristics do.
Fingerprint
minutiae uniquely identify fingerprints. It's proven that minutiae, were
unchanging and
repeatable features of each fingerprint, and were individually unique. Each
finger has a
1


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
unique arrangement of ridge detail. Tvpicallv; a full fingerprint contains up
to 100 points of
distinction. A person need only be fingerprinted one time to be in the system.

Everyone is affected by identity theft. Identity theft occurs when a criminal
assumes the
identity of someone else for the purpose of purchasing goods or services,
obtaining funds, or
gaining access to private information. Protection from identity theft ensures
that (1) one's
good name is not damaged, and (2) one's financial resources and personal data
are not subject
to attack. Today, identification is confumed by Bank Cards, PIN's and
Passwords,
Identification Cards, such as a Driver's License, Knowledge of a Social
Security Number.
All of these can be compromised. The onlv real deterrent to identity theft is
positive user
authentication.

Protection from fraud and identitv is urgentlv needed. This is important. not
only to ensure
that one's good name is not damaged, but also to ensure that one's financial
resources and
personal data cannot be so easily attacked. While passwords can be easily
misplaced or
duplicated and must be changed frequently, fingerprints are unique to every
individual.
Finger minutiae are the essential protection for law-abiding citizens,
govetnment and
business.

Banks are already moving to counteract check fraud by resorting to
fmgerprinting customers.
A number of major retailers have begun investigating the use of biometric
technologies to
track employees and other individuals via automated methods of measuring
physical
attributes or personal traits. Now finger minutiae, an advanced application
based on the
unique characteristics of the human fmger, is drawing increasing attention as
a potential
weapon in the fight against credit card fraud. MasterCard estimates that fmger
minutiae
technology, implemented on a global scale, could cut industry fraud losses by
between 50%
and 60% per year. The FBI estimates that credit fraud cost VISA& and
MasterCard $1.63
billion worldwide in 1995. Despite some anticipated advances in security
through the use of
smart cards and improved encoding, it remains unlikely that security concetns
will keep pace
with marketing and customer convenience technologies across the broad market.
Bv the year
2000, gross bank card volume is expected to total $9.9 trillion." (American
Banker. May 26
1998, V 163, N98, P 16-1)

Signing a check, approving a purchase. using a credit card, accessing
confidential
information -- all these activities depend on reliablv verifying your
identity. Fingerprints are
recognized all over the world as positive and undeniable proof of identity.
and. unlike
2


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
passwords that may be forgotten or debit cards that can be stolen, a person
always has his
fingerprints with him.

U.S. Patent 5.103.486 (Grippi) discloses a combination fmgerprint-signature
identification
system. In this system. prisms are used to capture the fingerprint of the
index fmger while the
individual is signing his/her name. The fmgerprint image and the signature are
processed to
form an composite representative for comparison with information shown on a
credit card for
processing of commercial transactions. While this svstem combines signature
and fingerprint
biometrics to confirm identification, the system still requires the use of
credit cards, is limited
to those two biometrics (index fmgerprint and signature), and is limited to
the use of optical
sensors which are ineffective in commercial settings.

U.S. Patent No. 5.680.470 (Moussa et al.) discloses a method of signature
verification
involving a set of template signatures that are examined for test features
which are
normalized and irrelevant features are removed. Similarly. U.S. Patent No.
5,559,895 (Lee et
al.) discloses a system for real time signature verification where the
signatures are digitized
for statistical analysis and various personal features are selected.

Current stvlus-type verification systems use accelerometers and pressure
sensors to measure
stylus pressure and stroke sweep in the users' signature. U.S. Patent No.
5,774,571
(Marshall) discloses a stylus with multiple sensors for biometric verification
including grip
pressure sensors and eyroscopes. U.S. Patent No. 4,513.437 (Chainer et al.)
discloses another
data input stvlus for sianature verification which includes accelerometers and
pressure
sensors. U.S. Patent No. 5, 247,137 (Epperson) discloses a stvlus that enables
biometric
identification by means of comparison of graphics data and textural data from
a remote
location. The stylus also captures strokes and gestures which can also be used
for confirming
identification.

Even so, confirmation of identification is often slow and tedious at the point-
of-sale termtttal.
Generally, a four-step process is used: (1) the customer swipes the card
through a card
reader; (2) the bank checks and verifies the status of the cardholder's
account; (3) once
approved, the cardholder signs his name: and (4) the cardholder's ID is
checked by
displaying a driver's license or the like.

Fingerprints are the universal identifier. Visa& and MasterCard are exploring
print sensors
within screens at point-of-sale terminals and directlv on the card. Since the
stylus must be
erasped to sign one's name and a sianature is required in credit transactions,
the natural place
3


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
for the print sensors is within the stvlus. A transaction using the system of
the present
invention requires only that the customer signs the note and the bank approves
the
transaction. A customer will be thrilled to complete a credit transaction
simply by signing his
name without using credit cards. The system of the present invention revives
an age-old
custom of a merchant extending credit on a signature.

What is needed is a svstem that uses state-of-the-art technology, a svstem
that eliminates the
use of all types of personal identification cards, a system that is virtually
impregnable to
criminals. a system that will significantly reduce transaction time, a system
that is universal in
virtually all environments, a system that provides maximum safeguards to
participating
financial institutions. a system that will enable the customer to access his
or her funds from
any location but .vill deny access to all others, a system that is convenient
to use and
unobtrusive to customers. and a system that provides anonymity in many
transactions.

What is needed is a means to convert from a card-based commercial transaction
system to a
cardless commercial transaction system, the means being user friendly,
thereafter enabling
customers to participate in either system. What is needed is a means for
confircning personal
identification that is reliable, state-of-the-art, that enables authorized
persons entry into their
accounts while preventing such entry to all others, while actually
discouraging criminals from
trying to crack such svstems. What is needed is a system that enables a person
upon arrival at
the complex to register submitting one or more biometric identifiers which are
entered and a
credit account is established. and thereafter the guest not need carry on his
person while
within the complex any cash. chips, credit cards, house cards, kev-cards.
being able to engage
in any activities offered within the complex.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In order to convert from a card-based fmancial system to a cardiess system,
the system of the
present invention employs a stylus that senses a complete varietv of biometric
properties,
particularly. the fingerprints of the index finger and the thumb, while the
customer uses the
implement to sign his name, or even for writing anything. The stylus enables
the conversion
at point-of-sale terminals when used to verify signatures. and in closed
environments where
house cards are issued for a limited purpose or within a limited area.
Applicants can also use
the stvlus to participate in government pro>aams (such as subsidies. voter
resistration, and
driver's licenses).

4


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
The identification verification svstem of the present invention offers
improved transaction
security for financial institutions by virtuallv eliminating consumer fraud
and counterfeiting,
offers improved efficiency by streamlining the transaction time (the customer
signs name and
submits identifier), while offering improved customer convenience bv
virtttallv replacing
cards in wallets or purses ( credit cards, debit cards. stored value cards,
pre-paid cards, ATM
cards. and the like

The system of the present invention revolutionizes the nature of commercial
transactions.
Positioned at the center of this system is a biometric stylus. The stylus
captures the
fmgerprints of the index fmger and thumb when the customer signs his name.
Initially, the
customer registers bv using the stvlus. Each time when the customer sims his
name during a
face-to-face transaction. the prints are compared against the reference prints
to authenticate
ID.

Pens with sensors are now beginning to appear at some point-of-sale terminals.
These stylus
do not capture fmgerprints, but rather are used only for purposes of signature
verification.
Initially, the system of the present invention will verify signatures
replacing these styluses.
Next, the use of credit and debit cards will become optional. Since the system
of the present
invention is fully compatible with existing card system, the transition will
be smooth. The
market for the system of the system of the present invention is all point-of-
sale terminals,
banks. and government agencies worldwide.

Once the system of the present invention is implemented on a worldwide basis,
fraud will be
drasticallv reduced. and customer convenience dramatically enhanced. Also, the
system of
the present invention will be universally accepted like credit cards, will
provide customer
convenience that cash or credit cards can't even approach. and will provide
customer safety
that far exceeds cash or credit card systems.

Compaq Computer is now selling computers with print sensors in their keypads.
Instead of
entering a PIN or a Password to access a computer network, the user puts his
finger onto a
glass lens the size of a postage stamp. The fingerprint is photocopied and
compared to
thousands of other prints. The process takes less than a second and the sensor
costs under
$100. Similarly. Identix has developed a fingerprint system that produces
forensic-quality
tenprint records, and Veridicom. has developed advanced software and hardware
components
using Bell Labs patented fingerprint authentication technology. The system of
the present
invention incorporates a pair of these tvpe sensors into a stylus used for
signirtg a promise to
pay.



CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
Banks benefit as credit card fraud is reduced at least fifty percent. The
svstem of the present
invention virtually ensures that only someone with matching prints will have
access to the
account. The bank controls the transaction, capturing and processing as much
biometric data
as necessary before deciding whether to approve. Merchants and customers also
benefit
from reducing credit card fraud since some of the costs are passed onto them.
The system of
the present invention assists law enforcement in identifving and apprehending
criminals.
Criminals are discouraged since anyone trying to access an unauthorized
account is identified
immediatelv. Merchants benefit as transaction time is minimized. The system
automatically
captures the print data when the customer signs his name and processing begins
immediately.
Customers benefit since they no longer need to carrv cards. Cards are easily
lost or stolen.
signatures are easily forged and PIN's are readily determined by criminals.
While cards
provide a useful alternative to cash, they are now almost as negotiable as
cash to
sophisticated criminals. The system of the present invention provides optimal
safety for the
customer by eliminating the need to carry all credit cards, debit cards. ATM
cards, stored
value cards, and pre-paid cards in a wallet or purse. At point-of-sale
tenninals. cardholders
will have the added convenience of being able to (1) continue using their
cards, (2) use the
system of the present invention, exclusively; or (3) use both interchangeably.

Registration using the system of the present invention is similar to opening a
new bank
account. The applicant provides the bank with basic information; name,
address, phone
number. and signature. The only difference is that the stylus of the present
invention enables
the capture of fingerprint data while the applicant signs his name. Another
way to register at
point-of-sale terminals, is to replace styluses currently used for signature
verification with the
biometric styluses of the present invention. Once the prints are initially
captured, the card
isn't needed. The next time the cardholder wants to access the same account he
need only
sign his name. Of course, the cardholder can also continue to use the card.

The account is accessed at any point-of-sale terminal. The person signs his
name using a
biometric stylus of the present invention that's identical to the stylus used
during registration.
The prints are again captured and compared to the prints of all registrants in
search of a
match. Once the bank confirms that there are sufficient funds in the account.
the amount is
debited from the account. and the transaction is approved. That's all there is
to it!

A cardholder can transfer funds into a new account at a point-of-sale terminal
by use of a
credit card at a point-of-sale tetminal by using the stylus of the present
invention. The
cardholder swipes his card through the cardreader and sims and prints his name
using the
stvlus of the present invention. The prints are captured and the cardholder
advises the credit
6


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
card bank of the amount to be transferred. Account information is exchansed
and the card is
not needed next time.

A debit variation of the system of the present invention provides improved
customer
convenience for debit. pre-paid. and stored-value type transactions. No credit
is extended to
the customer. who pays for his account in advance. This variation opens the
financial system
to everyone, regardless of credit rating, class. or legal standing. The
customer does not need
bank affiliation. since the account is assigned to a system bank if none is
designated.

The debit variation is initiated at any point-of-sale terminal. ATM, or bank
by transferring
cash. checks. money order. or credit cards into the account. Since credit is
not being
extended to the customer. less information is needed. Registration occurs
directlv with a
bank. or with the stylus of the present invention durine a debit transaction
at a point-of-sale
terminal (similar to the system of the present invention). The debit variation
also provides
anonymity in certain types of transactions. When the size of the participating
group is
limited, such as in a closed environment (hotel, amusement park, etc.), a
stylus can be used
without the fingerprint sensors. If the customer selects a pseudonym.
authentication is
confirmed by the signature and the other biometric sensors in the stylus.
Absolute identity is
protected without the prints and without disclosing a true identity.

Many retail outlets no longer accept checks because of fear of forgeries. A
check
confirmation variation of the system of the present invention provides the
perfect way to
authenticate identification at a point-of-sale terminal. The customer
registers with the
Biometric stylus of the present invention when opening his checking account.
When writing
a check, the bank is identified and approves the transaction. The system also
ensures against
overdrafts. Signature verification for checks is an added benefit for point-of-
sale terminals
that provide the system of the present invention. This check authentication
program can also
replace conventional checks.

The system of the present invention is particularly useful in a closed
environment, such as a
hotel, casino, theme park. library, university campus, cruise liner. militarv
base, prison, sports
complex. that are limited as to geographical area or as to services provided
or both. Once
enrolled into the cardless transaction system of the present invention. any
guest upon
registration with the hotel complex has full and complete access to any
amenity within the
complex. at anytime. without carrving on his person anvthing other than
biometric
identification that is inherent in his being.

7


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
The system of the present invention comprises biometric registration upon
entry into the
complex. biometric access to a guest room. biometric play of slot machines.
biometxic play at
gaming tables. and biometric purchases on-site within the complex such as
restaurants,
lounges, boutique shops. and the like.

A guest to register upon registration with the hotel complex confirms his
identitv upon arrival
and check-in. selects an amount to be entered into a credit account, enters
biometric
identifiers that are to be used on-site during his stay. Thereafter whenever
the guest seeks
access to his room or access to the credit account, identification is
confirmed by matching the
biometric identifiers and the guest can participate in amenities offered
within the complex.
The biometric identifiers are preferably prints of the index ftnger and thumb
and are sensed
by means of a stylus . The stylus is preferable a stylus which has a special
sensing grip to fit
the hand and enable a good reading of the thumb and index finger. The grip is
transparent.
The stylus is preferably portable and includes a sensor an optical or imaging
print sensor.
Once read. the signals of the prints are transmitted for processing. The guest
can add value to
his account at terminals throughout the casino.

The cardless transaction system of the present invention also enables room
access to a guest
suite when the guest grasps a door handle and rotates the handle.
identification being
confitmed once the door handle is grasped. Most hotel rooms have a latch-type
door for
room access. When the guest wants access to his room, he grasps the latch
handle with his
thumb in a preset location, generally the top of the cylinder attaching the
latch portion to the
door. He applies pressure to the latch portion and the thumb print is read by
an optical
sensor. The computer seeks a match the thumb print of the person who has
registered access
to the room. If identification is confirmed. room access is enabled.

The system enables a player to engage any slot machine on the premises purely
by biometric
means. A lever-type slot match operates similar to the latch-type hotel door
described above.
The player grasps the handle and pulls it forward, the thumb being placed on a
preset
location on the lever. If the slot machine is of the push button variety. the
player requests
plav at the machine by pressing the push button. An optical sensor reads the
print and seeks a
match with all registered prints in the system. Once identification has been
confirmed. and
the available credit balance in the player*s credit account is sufficient to
cover the play, play
is enabled. The biometric identifier ensures that the player making the waeer
is the player to
8


CA 02327580 2008-11-13

whom access to the credit account is enabled. The biometric identifier
prevents anY
unauthorized The playin¾.value saved within the computer system is made
available to the
player once identification has been confirmed. If the player wins. the credit
balance is
increased and if the player loses the credit balance is decreased.

The system enables a player to participate in any table game on the premises,
either while at
the table or from a remote location. Whilo the principles of the present
invention are
applicable to all games played within a casino (such as roulette. craps,
baccarat). reference in
this specification is made primarily to blackjack for purposes of illustration
only. The player
requcsts access to his credit account by pressing the push buttons on the
player stadon. An
optical sensor reads the print and seeks a match with all registered prints in
the system. Once
identification has been confirmed. and the available credit balance in the
player's credit
account is sufficient to cover the play, play is enabled. If the player wins,
the credit balance
is increased and if the player loses the. credit balance is decreased.
Identification is confumed
prior to each hand by biometric means. FIGUItES 18A and 18B disclose a
simplified logic
diagram.for enabling cmps play in a biometric manner.

The svstem enables a guest to make any on-site purchase. at a restaurant:
lounge, boutique
shop. or the like and access. the credit balance registered with the complex.
The guest erasps
a biometric stylus similar to the implement used at registration to enter the
print of the index
finger and thumb. An optical sensor reads the thumb and index-finger print
from the
implement and seeks a match with all registered prints in the system. Once
identification has
been confirmed. and the available credit balance in the guest's credit account
is sufficient to
cover the purchase. the purchase is made and the credit balance is decreased
by the amount of
the purchase.

The system is also applicable to resort hotel complexes that do not include
slot machines,
tables gaming, and other type of gambling activity. Similarly, the principles
of the present
invention are also applicable to standalone casinos that do not have guest
rooms. Registration
can occur for a standalone casino either off-site with pre-authorized third
parties or with the
casino.

9


CA 02327580 2008-11-13

In one aspect of the present disclosure, a stylus for use as an identity
verification device is
described. The stylus is coupled to a processor having a stylus body and a
sensor coupled
to and located on or within the stylus body. The sensor is adapted to capture
a thumbprint
of a user as a user thumb touches the sensor coupled to the stylus body. A
comparison of a
user thumbprint image to a first reference thumbprint image is used to verify
user identity
and user verification is enabled upon a match of the user thumbprint image and
the first
reference thumbprint image.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, an identity verification device
is described. The
identity verification device including a stylus having a body, and a sensor
coupled to and
located on or within the body. The sensor is adapted to capture a thumbprint
of a user as a
user thumb touches the stylus body. The identity verification device also
includes a memory
device for storing at least one reference print, and a processor coupled to
the sensor and the
memory device. The processor is adapted to receive the captured thumbprint and
to
compare the captured thumbprint with the at least one reference print.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a stylus is described that
includes a stylus body
and a sensor coupled to and located on or within the stylus body. The sensor
is adapted to
capture a fingerprint of a user as the user grasps the stylus. The stylus also
includes a
memory device within the stylus body that is adapted to store at least one
reference
fingerprint, and processor within the stylus body coupled to the sensor and
the memory
device. The processor is adapted to receive the captured fingerprint and to
compare the
captured fingerprint with the at least one reference fingerprint.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a stylus is described that
includes a stylus body
and a sensor coupled to and located on or within the stylus body. The sensor
is adapted to
capture a fingerprint of a user as a user finger touches the stylus body. The
stylus also
includes a memory device within the stylus body that is adapted to store at
least one
reference fingerprint, and a processor within the stylus body coupled to the
sensor. The
processor is coupled to the memory device and is adapted to receive the
captured fingerprint
9a


CA 02327580 2008-11-13

as well as to store the captured fingerprint within the memory device. The
processor is
further adapted to compare the captured fingerprint with the at least one
reference
fingerprint.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a stylus for use as an identity
verification device
is described. The stylus is coupled to a processor and includes a stylus body
having a
sensor. The sensor is adapted to capture a thumbprint of a user as a user
thumb touches the
sensor coupled to the stylus body. A comparison of a user thumbprint image to
a first
reference thumbprint image is used to verify user identity. User verification
is enabled upon
a match of the user thumbprint image and the first reference thumbprint image.

For a more complete understanding of the identification confirmation system of
the present
invention, reference is made to the following detailed description and
accompanying
drawings in which the presently preferred embodiments of the invention are
shown by way
of example. As the invention may be embodied in many forms without departing
from spirit
of essential characteristics thereof, it is expressly understood that the
drawings are for
purposes of illustration and description only, and are not intended as a
definition of the
limits of the invention. Throughout the description, like reference numbers
refer to the same
component throughout the several views.

9b


CA 02327580 2008-11-13
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGURE 1 discloses a preferred embodiment of a functional, block diagram of
the
identification confirmation system of the present invention:

FIGURE 2A discloses a writing stvlus with fingerprint sensors for use in the
system of the
present invention with a built-in grip;

FIGURE 2B discloses a section of the writing stylus shown in FIGURE 2A taken
along 2A-
2A;

FIGURE 3A discloses a preferred embodiment of the writing stylus with grip for
use in the
system of the present invention with a built-in grip;

FIGURE 3B discloses the print images obtained from the print imaging sensors
in the writing
stylus of FIGURE 3A;

FIGURE 4A discloses an assembly view of a conventional baU-point stylus with a
grip in
combination with a digital surface for use in the identification confimnation
system of the
present invention;

FIGURES 4B, 4C, and 4D disclose various grip configurations which provide
alignment of
the print sensors with the index fmger and thumb;

FIGURES 5A, 5B. 5C. 5D. and 5E disclose various grip configurations that are
compatible
with conventional styluses and pencils, the grip including a cord connection
to the writing
surface. and sensors being incorporated into the grip;

FIGURES 6A and 6B disclose a simplified logic 'diagram of one embodiment of
the
identification verification system of the present invention for registration;

FIGURES 7A and 7B disclose a simplified loeic diagram of one embodiment of the
identification verification system of the present invention when used in a
transaction:
FIGURES 8 discloses a simplified loeic diagram for conversion of a credit card
to a cardless
commercial transaction system for use with the identification verification
system of the



CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
present invention;

FIGURES 9 discloses a payment selector used by a customer to select which
account the
transaction is to be paid from in another variation of the identification
confirmation system of
the present invention:

FIGURES 10 discloses a keypad for use with a digitizing surface to enable data
entry such as
a primary identifier for use with the identification confumation system of the
present
invention;

FIGURE 11A is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram
configuration of the
system of the present invention for use in a closed environment (a hotel-
casino) replacing
conventional house cards and room keys;

FIGURE 11B is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram
configuration of the
system of the present invention for use in another closed environment (a stand-
alone casino)
replacing conventional house cards and room keys;

FIGURE 11C is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram
configuration of the
system of the present invention for use in yet another closed envirotunent (a
hotel-resort)
replacing conventional house cards and room keys;

FIGURE 12A is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram
configuration of the
primary components for the system of the present invention for use in the
hotel-casino of
FIGURE 11A - biometric registration. biometric room access, biometric gaming,
and
biometric on-site purchases;

FIGURE 12B is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram
configuration of the
system of the present invention for use in a stand-alone casino of FIGURE 11B-
biometric
registration. biometric casino gaming. and biometric on-site purchases;

FIGURE 12C is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram
configuration of the
primary components for the system of the present invention for use in a hotel-
resort of
FIGURER lIC - biometric reeistration. biometric room access. and biometric on-
site
purchases:

11


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
FIGURE 13A through 13D disclose one embodiment of a simplified a schematic
flowchart
for a logic sequence for a roulette game showing the gaming system from
initial clearance for
a player to final withdrawal of the player from the game for use with the
systems of 11A and
11B;

FIGURE 14 discloses a keypad for playing roulette using the system of FIGURES
11A and
11 B;

FIGURE 15 discloses a door latch for use in hotels and motels that adapts a
door latch with a
print sensor for the thumb as placed on the latch handle. identification being
verified as the
door is grasped for purposes of entry use with the systems of 11A. 11B. and I
1C;

FIGURE 16 discloses a gas pump equipped with print sensors for the thumb and
fingers for
use in a commercial transaction where the customer need not face the cashier
to pay for the
gasoline, identification being made as the tank is being filled;

FIGURE 17A is a schematic representation of a first preferred embodiment of an
optoelectronic system for enabling a fingerprint to be read . for use in the
biometric
management system of the present invention;

FIGURE 17B is a schematic representation of a second preferred embodiment of
an
optoelectronic system for enabling a fmgerprint to be read for use in the
biometric
management system of the present invention;

FIGURES 18A and I8B disclose one embodiment of a simplified schematic
flowchart for a
logic sequence for a craps game showing the gaming system from initial
clearance for a
player to final withdrawal of the player from the game;

FIGURE 19A discloses a simplified logic diagram enabling guest-room entry for
the
biometric latch or door knob for the biometric management system of the
present invention;
FIGURE 19B is a preferred embodiment of a functional block diaQram of a guest
room key
security system for use with system shown in FIGURE 11C; and

FIGIJRE 20 discloses another preferred embodiment of a process flow path for
identification
verification using the biometric identification system of the present
invention.

12


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to the drawings, in the broadest terms the preferred embodiment
of the
identification confirmation svstem of the present invention as shown in FIGURE
1 comprises
a stylus 2 with fmgerprint sensors disposed in a grip 4. a digitizing
inscription pad 5, a
keypad enabling data entry 6, a digital display unit 8, and a processing unit
7.

The stylus 2 includes sensors that capture biometric properties of the signer.
The processor 7
processes the captured information to determine whether to allow access to an
account, or
other entry or privilege once identification has been confirmed. In one
preferred
embodiment. the system includes means to enable the signer to enter a primary
identifier, the
identifier being a series of letters, digits, a spoken word converted to text
(speech
recoenition), or the like. The primary identifier is the signer's printed
name. the signer's
birthday (and year), zip code, mother's maiden name, or PIN or password.

The biometric stylus 2 of the identification confumation system of the present
invention has
print imaging sensors in the grip 4 to sense the index ftngerprint and thumb
print, in addition
to other biometric sensors including but not limited to the following:
pressure sensors (point
and grip); accelerometers; gyroscopes; position of index finger relative to
point; position of
thumb relative index finger. FIGURE 20 discloses a simplified logic diagram
where multiple
biometric sensors are used to determine account confirmation.

The biometric stylus 2 of the identification confirmation system of the
present invention has
print sensors positioned within the unique grip 4 (see FIGURES 2A and 2B).
Electronic
images of the index fmger and thumb are extracted during use. Thereafter, the
customer uses
a similar stylus to submit a set of prints for comparison with the set of
prints of the authorized
user - the prints either match or don't match. The use of two prints makes a
mistake highly
unlikely. The stylus 2 thwarts forgers since even if the signature is the same
the prints are not
(the content of the writing is unimportant). The stylus 2 is provided by
banks, POS
terminals, and govertnnent agencies worldwide. The principles of the biometric
stylus 2 are
combined with other biometrics housed within the stylus 2 to provide near
perfect
confirmation. Digital systems evaluate the fingerprint by comparing the
similarity, number,
and unit relationship of the points of distinction.

FIGURES 6A and 6B disclose a simplified logic diagram for registration with
the
identification confirmation system of the present invention. The customer
initially registers
with a bank or point-of-sale terminal bv signing his name with a special
identical stylus 2 and
exchanging legal tender to open the account. The account can be a debit
account. a savings
13


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
account, a checking account, or even a credit account. Much more information
is needed if
the customer seeks credit. Later when the customer wants to access the account
to pay for
goods or services. he signs his name with an identical stylus 2. Whenever the
customer wants
to access the credit account at a point-of-sale transaction, an identical
stylus 2 is used, the
customer signs his name, and the computer searches through the appropriate
files for
purposes of comparison (see FIGURES 7A and 7B).

In still another preferred embodiment of the identification confirmation
system of the present
invention additional biometric sensors are periodically added to the stylus 2
to provide the
financial institution with all information that is necessary. So long as the
additional sensors
do not affect the weight or balance of the stylus 2 so that fingerprint and
signature biometrics
are altered, no harm is done.

When registration occurs at someplace other than a financial institution, such
at a point of
sale tenninal. the customer pays legal tender to the merchant (a pre-paid or
stored value type
of account) who in exchange opens an account for the customer. The financial
institution is
the one affiliated with the merchant, thereby enabling the customer to open an
account
without ever having any bank affiliation. Such an account can be one where the
customer
opts not to use fingerprints and selects a pseudonym for purposes of privacy
as hereinafter
described.

The biometric identifiers are preferably prints of the index finger and thumb
and are sensed
by means of a stylus 2. The stylus 2 is preferable a stylus 2 which has a
special sensing grip
4 to fit the hand and enable a good reading of the thumb and index finger. The
grip 4 is
transparent. The stylus 2 is preferably portable and includes a sensor an
optical or print
imaging sensor. Once read, the images of the prints are captured for further
processing. In
one preferred embodiment, the biometric stylus 2 includes temperature sensors
for purposes
of activation. The sensors are well known in the art and are similar to the
heat sensors found
in elevators, the heat from the hand engaging the system.

In another embodiment, the point of the stylus 2 is a conventional fountain
pen 2 that ensures
that the orientation of the stylus 2 is aligned with the print sensors
disposed within the stylus
2. Preferably, a print sensor is disposed on the top surface of the stylus 2
and two additional
sensors are disposed on the adjacent side surfaces of the stylus 2. This
ensures repeatability
of print images sensed..

For a right-handed person, the index finger is aligned with the point and the
thumb is
positioned on the stylus surface abutting the left-side of the stylus top
surface. For a left
14


WO 99/52060 CA 02327580 2000-10-05
PCT/US99/07900
handed person, the index finger is aligned with the point and the thumb is
positioned on the
stvlus 2 surface abutting the right-side of the stylus top surface. By
capturing and comparing
the index finger and thumb print of the applicant with the reference finger
and thumb print,
the likelihood of an error becomes highly unlikely. In the event that a
biometric stylus 2 or
grip 4 is not available, manual backup enables conventional identity
confirmation.
Accordingly, sensors are positioned within the stylus 2 to read each of these
prints.

The stvlus 2 has a special sensing grip 4 to fit the hand and enable a good
reading of the
prints of the index finger and the thumb. The cross-section of the stylus 2 is
eenerally
rectangutar with rounded corners. and the print surfaces for the thumb and
index ftn¾er are
slightly recessed and concave. FIGURES 5A. SB, 5C. SD. and SE disclose various
preferred
embodiments of grip configurations that are compatible with conventional
styluses and
pencils. the grip 4 including a cord connection to the writing surface. and
sensors being
incorporated into the grip 4. FIGURE 5E shows a teardrop configuration with
the seam
pointing upward. The applicant points the seam upward and places his index
finger on one
side of the seam and his thumb on the other side of the seam. This embodiment
assures that
only two sensors are needed whether the applicant is right or left handed.
Also, the
combination concave-convex shape enables a larger portion of the two prints to
be sensed by
the print imaging sensors. FIGURES 3A and 3B disclose a U-shaped grip 4 and
the images
captured therefrom with the sensors.

In one variation. the biometric stylus 2 is attached to a surface or counter
by means of a
plastic coated hollow tube. containing fiber optic cable therewithin. It is
through the fiber
optic cable that the print images are transmitted to the processor disposed
within the surface
or counter. The sensors are disposed vrithin the stylus 2. In another
variation, the biometric
stylus 2 is portable. While the sensors are also disposed within the stylus 2.
the signals of the
prints are transmitted to the processor for conversion and storage. The prints
of the thumb
and index finger are preserved in the systems processor for as references for
subsequent
comparisons. The goods and service providers have a similar stylus 2 which is
used by the
guest to confirm identification and access the credit account.

In another embodiment a grip 4 is provided that is compatible with
conventional styluses and
pencils, the print imaging sensors being positioned within the grip 4. The
grip 4 is
symmetrical and preferably has a cubical shape with concave sidewalls. A power
cord is
affixed to the grip 4 to provide power to the sensors and also to prevent
theft. If the stylus 2
wears out or breaks down. it can be readily replaced with another conventional
stylus. at a
modest cost. Also. bv having standard grip sizes, anv problem with using
biometric stvluses


CA 02327580 2008-02-29

of differing sizes which might change some of the properties of the biometrics
are eliminated.
The grip configurations are designed to provide as good a reading as possible
of as much of
the index finger and thumb print as possible. Certain preferred embodiments
include
concave cubes (see FIGURE 4C), an enlarged cylindrical chamber section (see
attached
drawing). The grip 4 is preferably transparent and is desigtted to be self-
aligning, that is, the
customer must grasp the grip where the sensors are located to use the stylus.
FIGURE 4B is
self-alimsing using a lip that eliminates the need for a third senor to
accommodate both left
and right-handed people. FIGURE 4D discloses a fountain pen type stylus which
is self-
alignirtg because of the orientation of the pen tip.

While the power unit of the stvlus 2 can be incorporated into the body of the
stylus 2. the
stylus 2 is preferably not portable. and includes a power cord that is affixed
to the tablet
counter to prevent theft. The stylus 2 includes a print imaging sensor
configuration. as the
signals of the prints are transtnitted for processing. The fiber optic cable
transmits print
images to a processor. The processor is in the surface/counter. The stylus 2
includes a
sensor configuration.

For transactions involving a larger pools of potential customers, processing
strategies are
needed so that the system does not need to continually process millions of
files to confirm the
identity of the customer.

One main purpose of a credit-type card is to provide a primary identifier for
file searching
purposes. When the system of the present invention has widespread global
acceptance. it will
become necessary to distinguish the customer from hundreds of millions of
other people. It
is not practical to have the driver search such numbers of records for each
transaction.

The primary identifier in a conventional credit card tran.saction is any one
of the following:
the imprinted name; the imprinted personal address number; or the information
stored in the
magnetic stripe (smart card).

To replace a card, the replacement system also preferably includes at least
one primary
identifier. Examples of primarv identifiers comprise birthday (6 digit code),
zip code, PIN.
or printed name. There is a preference for numerical data because of language
and
translation problems. since Arabic numbering is essentially the global
standard.

Certain basic strategies are needed. Since the fingerprints ena.ble
deterrnination of whether
the customer is right or left handed. records of people that don't match the
hand of the
customer are discarded immediatelv during processing. ln one preferred
embodiment. the
si¾nature is the first biometric processed (when fingerprints are not used).
Writing styles that
16


WO 99/52060 CA 02327580 2000-10-05
PCT/US99/07900
are dissimilar enable almost all registered files to be rejected. The print of
the index finger
and thumb are the next biometrics used. If either or both cannot be read, the
customer is so
advised and the transaction is rejected. If the prints are of good quality.
each is checked as
against the remaining records in the pool of registered records. The prints of
each transaction
are preserved and used to develop an improved composite of the customer's
prints for
subsequent transactions.

In one preferred embodiment. a numerical is used (see FIGURE 10) to streamline
the
confirmation process. The customer enters a zip code or perhaps a PIN which is
checked
prior to the signature. The zip code is preferred in instances where the
clientele is national or
international. whereas a PIN is preferred for instances where the transaction
is regional.
There are two basic type of card transaction that the principles of the
identification svstem of
the present invention are of particular applicability to:

Credit transactions where the customer needs to identify himself/herself so
that the
institution can determine credit status for purposes of advancing credit. It
is critical
that exact identity be made at time of registration so that credit histories
can be
properly accessed and analyzed; and

Prepaid or stored value type of transactions where the customer has deposited
an
amount of money for subsequent use.

In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the exact identity of
the customer can
be withheld in prepaid or stored-value transactions. In one preferred
embodiment of the
present invention, the stylus 2 includes an on-off switch. In the off
position. the fingerprint
sensors are not used. so that the conftrmation is done without sensing the
fuigerprints. In this
embodiment, the signature becomes the primary biometric. If the customer signs
a
pseudonym rather than his regular name, withholding his actual name. the
system processes
the transactions without knowing the customer's actual name or his prints. As
long as the
pseudonym is used to access the account, anonymity is assured while using the
identification
system of the present invention.

The same result can be achieved bv having two separate styluses, (l) a stylus
2 which
includes print sensors for transactions where privacy is not the primary
concern: and (2) a
stylus 2 without print sensors for stored value or prepaid accounts. In yet
another preferred
embodiment. the print sensors are incorporated in the grip 4. and the grip 4
is removed when
the fingerptints are not to be used. The onlv thing that is necessarv is that
the individual be
able to access his account. so that the system provides near perfect
repeatability. Of course
17


CA 02327580 2008-02-29

the customer will need to remember the alias used to access the account. Tlus
is particularly
attractive feature to those people with concems about individual privacy,
since they may
panicipate in blind transactions while usine the stylus 2. The customers can
obtain print-outs
of monthlv statements by going to a spetial temninal and verifying his
identification with a
biometric stylus 2 and thereafter requesting such information.

Transactions where the pool of potential customers is under 50,000 people
include closed
environments tike resorts. hotels. colleges, dormitories, theme parks,
prisons. cruise liners,
and the like. For this volume of registrants. the primary identifier is not
needed. but if used,
does improve transaction time and system efficiency somewhat.

The identification confirmation system of the present invention enables a
credit card holder
to convert the account to use with the biometric stylus 2(see FIGURES 8 which
discloses a
simplified logic diagram). The conversion process enables - the cardholder to
conduct
transactions with the stylus 2 or by presenting the card. Upon signing with
the stylus 2. the
driver accesses the card record for the cardholder and creates a duplicate
record in the
verification system of the present invention. Thereafter, the cardholder
transfers legal tender
from his card eredit balance to the new account. If all of the available
balance is transferred
over, the credit card is destroyed. FIGURES 9 discloses a payment selector
used by a
customer to select whieh account the transaction is to be paid from in another
variation of the
identification confirmation system of the present invention.

A credit cardholder can also set up a new account at a point-of-sale mrminal
by use of his
card. The cardholder swipes his card through a cardreader and signs and prints
his name
using the biometric stylus 2. The biometrics are captured and the cardholder
advises the
credit card bank of the amount to be transferred to the new account. Account
information is
exchanged and the card is no longer needed.

A variety of digitiang inscription pads are known in the an. U.S. Patent
5,652,412
(Lazzouni) discloses an apparatus for reading and storing coordinate
information
representative of the instantaneous position of a stylus on a writing surface.
The system
provides a writing paper having a prerecorded pattern of pixels. each pixel
containing
encoded location in.formation which identifies an absolute and unique
coordinate location on
the paper. The system enables the simultaneously recording of written
information on
encoded paper and for recording the written information in a memory. Other
di¾itizing
inscription pads can be found in U.S. Patent No. 5.05 1.736 (Bennett et al.):
U.S. Patent No.
5,477,012 (Sekendur): and U.S. Patent No. 4.688.933 (Lapeyre). Also. U.S.
Patent No.
18


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCTIUS99/07900
5,263.742 (Koch) discloses a fmgerprinting system where the print is developed
by making a
copy on a sensitized surface by back reflecting radiant energy through an
adhesive where the
print is imaged. Similarly, U.S. Patent No. 5,709,746 (Ballard) discloses a
self-contained
fingerprint kit.

While the biometric stylus 2, signature. and other biometrics that can be
captured by the
combination stylus 2 and digitizing inscription pad are sufficient to
distinguish the customer
from hundreds of millions of others, an efficient search strategy is needed.

While there has been considerable development of technology of improved
sensing systems
for signatures. the signature is not and probably never will be the biometric
of choice since
handwriting and signatures change with time and every with each writing such
that a match
with perfect confidence is not possible. However. the signature is needed for
legal purposes.
so that it will always be needed to include some sort of signature
verification -into any
identification system. The signatures of each transaction are preserved and
used to develop
an improved composite of the customer's signature for subsequent transactions.

The biometrics needed are all provided bv the stylus 2. The primary biometric
is the print of
the index finger, and the thumb print being the other primary biometric. Some
examples of
secondary biometrics comprise the signature, stylus point pressure, stvtus
grip pressure,
accelerometers, gyroscopes, position of index finger, position of thumb
relative to index
finger.

Also, a timer is extremely useful in measuring biometrics associated with
signature. The
timer is useful in determining acceleration and deceleration, the time needed
to sign the
name, the time spacing that the stylus 2 is lifted from the digital surface.
and first name time,
middle initial time, and last nazne time.

Alphanumeric data for the primary identifier can be provided by (1) a
digitizing inscription
pad, (2) a mouse and CRT, (3) a touch sensitive CRT, (4) voice and speech
recognition, and
(5) a keypad embedded in the writing surface.

In applications where higher populations are involved, one preferred
embodiment includes
more than one primary identifier in the event that approval is denied, that
the another search
can be initiated for backup purposes.

Banks benefit in that credit card fraud is eliminated. The Identification
confirmation system
of the present invention system is virtually impregnable to criminals. The
bank controls the
entire transaction. since they capture and process as many biometrics as
necessary before
19


W099/52060 CA 02327580 2000-10-05
PCT/US99/07900
deciding whether or not to approve. Merchants and customers also benefit since
consumer
fraud costs are often passed onto them. Fingerprints are recogzlized all over
the world as
positive proof of identity and are the key to the system. Each finger contains
up to 100
different points of distinction which never change with time. Merchants
benefit in that the
transaction time is minimized. The identification confirmation system of the
present
invention system minimizes the time between when the customer signs his name
and when
the transaction is approved. The system automatically captures the fingerprint
data when the
customer signs his name and processing begins immediately. Any transaction
that does not
involve cash requires a customer signature anyway - his obligation to pay.
Customers also
benefit from improved transaction efficiency by not having to wait in slow-
moving lines.
Customers benefit in that all cards are eliminated. Cards are easily lost or
stolen, simatures
are easily forged and PIN's are readily determined by criminals. While cards
are easier to
carry than money. they are almost as negotiable as money to sophisticated
criminals. The
identification confirmation system of the present invention system provides
maximum
security and safety for the customer by eliminating the need to carry all
credit cards. debit
cards, ATM cards. stored value cards, and pre-paid cards in a wallet or purse.

As shown in FIGURE 2A, the identification confiimation system of the present
invention
uses a biometric stylus 2 that has print imaging sensors positioned within the
unique grip 4.
Electronic images of the index fmger and thumb are extracted during user
registration.
Thereafter. an applicant uses a similar stylus 2 to submit a set of prints for
comparison with
the set of prints of the authorized user - the prints either match or don't
match. The use of
two prints makes a mistake highly unlikely. The stylus 2 will thwart forgers
since the content
of the writing is unimportant. The stylus 2 is provided by banks. POS
terminals, and
government agencies worldwide.

In one preferred embodiment, the principles of the biometric stylus 2 can be
combined with
signature verification technology to identify the applicant and the writing
content. Also,
since prints of the index finger and thumb of the writing hand are the most
common
biometrics, once captured the prints can be used for comparing other types of
touch contact
(e.g. - a keypad). In another preferred embodiment, a digitizing inscription
pad is used, and
the position of the stylus 2 relative to the surface enables determination of
the written text.
An optical sensor in the writing surface reads the signature or the writing to
be used in
combination with the prints. Alternatively. the system includes a keypad in
the writing
surface for the customer to enter a PIN instead of the optical sensor or in
addition to the
optical sensor.



WO 99/52060 CA 02327580 2000-10-05
PCT/US99/07900
There are several types of print sensors that are preferred for the stylus 2
the following being
listed with the preferred first.

Veridicom. Inc. uses a CMOS chip. These plates are covered with a thin layer
of
dielectric. When a finger is placed on top of the chip, each sensor acts as
the bottom plate
of a capacitor, with the surface of the finger acting as the top plate. The
Veridicom chip
as small as a postage stamp -- can be easily embedded into laptop computers
and
keyboards. Accompanying circuitry measures the capacitance of each of these
sensors.
Fingertip "valleys" are further from the chip, and show as a lower
capacitance. Fingertip
"ridges" yield a higher capacitance. The chip's dielectric technology enables
people to
touch the sensitive. silicon chip without destroying it. The dielectric is
chemically and
mechanically strong enough to allow repeated contact with people's fingers,
yet
electronically sensitive enough to capture the prints. Other suppliers of CMOS
fmgerprint
sensors are Siemens, and Harris.

Identicator Technology Inc. uses Identicator's DFR-200 reader technology and
its software
algorithm technologies. A matchbox-sized fingerprint reader enables full
feature
extraction and match in less than one second. Instead of entering an ID and
password to
get into a corporate network. users simply put their finger atop the glass
lens of a tiny
reader affixed to the personal computer. The device photocopies the print and
compares it
to a database of thousands of other prints in well under a second. The
Identicator print
sensor enables secure user authentication on PC's.

TouchSafe Personal from Identrix is a state-of-the-art fmgerprint verification
reader. The
design works with portables, desktops or servers, and assists with finger
placement.
TouchSafe Personal uses an internal 32-bit RISC processor. compact optics and
encrypted
serial communications. The optional smart card reader can store the fmgerprint
template
and other confidential data. The Identix TouchPrint 600 Live-Scan Workstation
is a
fingerprint system that produces forensic-quality tenprint records by
electronicalhscanning and capturing rolled fingerprints.

Registration in the system of the present invention is similar to opening a
new bank account.
An application provides the bank with basic information - name. address. phone
number. and
sienature. The only difference is that a special stylus 2 is used that enables
the bank to
21


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCTIUS99/07900
capture certain data while the applicant signs his name. These biometrics
include prints of
the index finger and thumb. and point and grip pressure.

The account can be accessed at any point-of-sale terminal. The person signs
and prints his
name using a biometric stylus 2 that's identical to the stylus 2 used during
registration. The
biometrics are again captured and compared to the biometrics of all
registrants in search of a
match. The bank then confirms that there are sufficient funds in the account,
deducts the
amount from the account. and approves the transaction. That's all there is to
it!

A credit cardholder can also set up a new account at a point-of-sale terminal
by use of his
card. The cardholder swipes his card through a cardreader and signs and prints
his name
usin¾ the biometric stylus 2 . The biometrics are captured and the cardholder
advises the
credit card bank of the amount to be transferred to the new account. Account
information is
exchanged and the card is no longer needed.

Automated systems evaluate the fmgerprint features by showing the coincidence
of the
minutiae features. taking into consideration the similarity, number, and unit
relationship of
the characteristics to each other. Searching and matching of fingerprints is
accomplished by
assigning each minutiae point a position on an x/y coordinate, a direction of
flow, and
relationship to other minutiae. If a person has to use a stylus 2 anyway to
verify a
commercial transaction, why not use sensors in the stylus 2 and writing
surface to confirm
identification (forget about the plastic cards).

In still another preferred embodiment of the identification confirmation
system of the present
invention, other sensors are added to the stylus 2, as necessary, to tighten
security and reduce
fraud - including a pressure sensor to measure point pressure; another
pressure sensor to
measure grip pressure; an accelerometer to the stylus point to measure stroke
speed; a
gyroscope positioned at the top end of the stylus 2 to measure the angle of
the stylus 2; a
heat sensor in the stylus grip 4 to measure position of the index finger
relative to the point;
and a position sensor in the stylus grip 4 to measure the position of the
thumb relative to the
index finger. Additional sensors include measuring the speed of the signature.
the customers
fmger temperature. and so on. While all of these biometric identifiers are
subject to minor
variations, the bank checks as many as needed until it is satisfied that the
person seeking
entry is authorized to access the account.

In a perfect system. the person who is entitled to entry will always be
enabled entry, and all
others will always be kept out. Hence, in addition to primary identifiers and
biometrics
(primary and secondary) other demographic information is analyzed when the
decision of
22


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCT/US99/07900
identity is in doubt to assure that the system of the present invention
operates in a near-
perfect manner. Such demographic information includes the location of the
transaction
request relative to the primary residence of the registrant, the frequency (if
ever) that the
registrant has ever engaged is such transactions, and whether or not the
registrant has made
other transaction during the past 24-hour period and where such transactions
are located.

In vet another embodiment a grip 4 is provided that is compatible with
conventional styluses
and pencils. the print imaging sensors being positioned within the grip 4. The
grip 4 is
svmmetrical and preferably has a cubical shape with concave sidewalls. A power
cord is
affixed to the grip 4 to provide power to the sensors and also to prevent
theft. If the stylus 2
wears out or breaks down. it can be readily replaced with another conventional
stylus, at a
modest cost. Also, bv having standard grip sizes. any problem with using
biometric styluses
of differing sizes which might change some of the properties of the biometrics
are eliminated.
Some primary applications for the system of the present invention include
identification for
(I) Drivers' license registration and verification; (2) Voter registration and
confirmation; (3)
Law enforcement; (4) Credit card verification; (5) All banking transactions;
and (6) College
and high school students for applying for financial aid and to confirm test-
taker
identification.

In still another embodiment of the system of the present invention, the
biometric stylus 2 is
combined with one or more primary identifiers to authenticate identification
to replace credit,
debit cards and the like. The primary identifiers include phone number. name.
area code or
zip code. The system performs the initial search based upon the primary
identifier(s) to
reduce the size of the universe. Then identity is either confirmed or denied
based upon the
prints. In another preferred embodiment, additional biometric sensors are used
in addition to
the fingerprints.

To better illustrate how the principles of the present invention can be used
in closed
environments to replace single purpose cards, house cards, debit cards and the
like, attention
is now drawn to FIGURES 11A, 11B, and 11C. which illustrate various closed
environments
(hotel-casino. a stand-alone casino, and a hotel-resort. respectively. PCT
Application
97/05736 (Black and Dvkman) discloses a system whereby the casino is able to
acquire all
information relative to live games in the casino (such as blackjack. roulette.
and craps) by use
of scanners, house cards. and interactive monitors. The casino is able to
ascertain the identity
of each player. how much each player is wagering. each player's gaming
decisions. and the
value of the gaming materials. See for example U.S. Patent 5.326.104: U.S.
Patent
23


CA 02327580 2008-02-29

5,340,119; U.S. Patenc 5,566,327 (Sehr). Similarly. FIGURES 12A, 12B. and 12C
disclose
is a functional block diagram disclosing a block diagram configuration of the
primary
components for the system of the present invention for use in the systems of
FIGURES 11A.
11 B, and 1 I C. respectively.

The system of the present invention comprises biometric registration upon
entry into the
complex. biometric access to a guest room, biometric purchases on-site within
the complex
such as restaurants. lounges. boutique shops, and the like, and biometric play
of slot
machines. biometric play at gaming tables.

To pardcipate in the system of the present invention, the ¾utst selects the
biometric option
during registradon, confirms his identity. selects. an amount to be entered
into a credit
account, and enters biometric identifiers that are to be used on-site during
his stay.
Thereafter whenever the guest seeks access to his room or access to the credit
account,
identification is confirmed by matchirtg the biometric identifiers and the
guesi can participate
in all amenities offered within the complex.

The biometric identifiers of choice involve prints of the hand. since hands
are the natural way
for people to manually engage a device. such as slot machine. a keypad, a door
latch. and a
stylus 2. While other hand prints. such as the palm and prints of all the
fingers, the hand
prints are preferably the print of the thumb and the index finger for reasons
hereafter
described. During registration. the guests are offered one or more choices of
on-site
participation during their stay.

A first option is conventional identification where the guests cany on their
persons cash,
chips, credit cards, and the like so that they have access to various areas
within the complex,
such as their guest rooms. table games within the casino, slot machines within
the casino.
shops, lounges, and restaurants, and entertainment.

A second option is the system described in PCT Application 97/05736 (Black et
al.), wherein
the guests use a key-card within the hotel complex. The room key is in the
general shape of a
credit card and enables room access. The opposite edge of the room key has
value added
thereto during re¾istration. enablin¾ the ¾uest to pay for eoods and services
while on the
premises bv use of the card so lone as there is sufficient value in the credit
account to cover
24


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCTIUS99/07900
the costs of such goods and services. When the value of the credit account
becomes
depleted. the guest either purchases additional value or uses another fotm of
payment.

In order to prevent the use of the card by unauthorized persons. the user
identifies himself
prior to use. While a PIN may be useful for purposes of identification. it is
generally agreed
that when considerable value is involved, better securitv than what a PIN can
provide is
needed. The identifier of choice for this svstem is a thumbprint that the
guest uses to confum
identin,. The print is registered during check-in. is digitized and preserved
in a file for the
guest. The key-card includes data that matches the guest with the print. The
guest requests
access to the credit account by inserting the key-card into a card reader.
Once a match is
made of the thumbprints access is enabled.

The key-card system is completely compatible with conventional systems as
mentioned in the
first option. The two systems can operate side by side. wherein some guests
use the first
option while others the second. It is also possible for the same guest to use
the key-card
system for a while, and switch at any time to the conventional system, and
back again to the
key-card system

The third option is the process control system of the present invention which
is compatible
with conventional play. with the key-card option, both systems together. and
even other
systems. Since a biometric is preferably emploved in the key-card system. the
system of the
present invention eliminates the key-card completely, and simply enable a
guest to use
biometrics to access his credit account from anywhere with the complex.

The biometric identifiers of choice are the prints of the thumb and index
finger of the right
hand for a right-handed person, and the thumb and index finger of the left
hand for a left-
handed person. The prints are submitted to the system processor by
conventional means
wherebv the guest places his thumb and then his finger onto a transparent
button. enabling
such prints to be read and digitized for subsequent use. Confinnation of thumb
and
ftngerprints can be accomplished at all point-of-sale locations within the
complex by optical
sensors similar to the re¾istration system.

Another means for biometric identification in all point-of-sale transactions
involves a stvlus 2
that enables the hotel to use the auest's si¾nature which is submitted during
check-in as an
identifier.



WO 99/52060 CA 02327580 2000-10-05
PCTIUS99/07900
Yet another way to register into the system of the present invention is bv
means of a unique
biometric stylus 2. The biometric identifiers are preferably prints of the
index finger and
thumb and are sensed by means of a stylus 2. The stylus 2 is preferable a
stylus 2 which has
a special sensing grip 4 to fit the hand and enable a good reading of the
thumb and index
finger. The grip 4 is transparent. The stylus 2 is preferably portable and
includes an optical
or print imaging sensor. Once read. the signals of the prints are transmitted
for processing.
The guest can add value to his account at terminals throughout the casino.

When one uses a stylus 2. it is generally grasped by the index finger and
thumb for purposes
of writing on a flat surface. The stylus 2 includes two adjacent flat surfaces
which are
specifically configured to optimize the completeness of the prints taken. lf
the guest is right-
handed. the surface used to read the index fmger is to the right of the second
surface. If the
guest is left handed. the surface for the index finger is to the left of the
second surface. In
both instances the second surface is used to read the guest's thumbprint.
Accordingly,
sensors are embedded within the stylus 2 to read each of these prints.

The fingerprint capture and verification system is commercially available from
Thomson-
CSF Semiconducteurs Specifiques (TCS) and Oxford Micro Devices, Inc. TCS'
FingerChipL silicon chip fingerprint sensor and Oxford's A236 video digital
signal
processor chip are deployed together to create a fully-programmable and
optimized
fingerprint capture and verification system. The FingerChipT~d measures only 2
millimeters
by seventeen millimeters and uses print imaging to capture images of the
guest's fingerprint
disposed over the protected surface of the chip. After the finger is swept
across the surface,
an image of the fmgerprint is reconstructed from a sequence of video images
and digitized.
The image data is then processed and reconstructed by an algorithm that is
proprietary to
Thomson. after which verification of the fmgerprint is performed.

Another version of the biometric stylus 2 employs optical sensors and imaging
(see
FIGURES I 7A and 1713) The one or more sensors are preferably compatible with
an
optoelectronic sensing and processing system. The sensor enables a new version
of the
biometric print to be during check-in. The sensors are in cooperative
engagement with the
processor where the prints are stored for future use. The processor advises
the employee at
the point-of-sale transaction to enable access to the credit account when the
new version of
the biometric print matches the reference version of the biometric print.

26


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
The optoelectronic system includes a laser source to improve system accuracy
and uses
Fourier transforms. which are generally realized in numerous applications of
pattern
recognition techniques. The sensors are highly sensitive to the relative
angular orientation of
the matched filter and the biometric print.

The handprint area on the surface of the biometric stylus 2 enables the
reading of the
biometric prints is transparent providing a means for angular orientation in
real time and
response in real time. The thumb and index finger are placed against the print
areas of the
biometric stylus 2.

The light from the laser illuminates the tips of the thumb and index fmger,
and the light
reflected from the thumb and index fmger tips pass as an encoded beam through
a spherical
lens which projects the beam upon a matched filter located at its shadow
plane. The matched
filter represents the complex spatial Fourier transform of the image of a
reference thumbprint
and index-finger print, having been produced with coherent light on any
suitable recording
medium such as photographic, thermoplastic or photothermoplastic media.

For subsequent matching, the person rotates the thumb or index finger to align
the Fourier-
transform of the introduced thumb with the stored hoiographic representation
of the
authorized thumbprint. As the person rotates the thumb correlation procedures
are realized
continuously in time until the images are angularly matched and a correlation
signal is
present.

The Fourier-spectrum comparison provides invariance to in-plane displacements
of the
introduced image and invariance to in-plane scale differences. The procedure
automatically
provides the formation of the correlation signal inside the wavefront, the
procedure being
absolutely real-time, as a result of the implementation of the two-dimensional
spatial
comparison.

A photo-sensitive element is located in the shadow plane of the matched
filter. The output
command signal of the photo-sensitive element is cooperatively engaged to the
security
access member. such as a release member of a guest room or a trigger member of
a slot that
engages the rotating drums of the slot machine causing them to rotate. The
securitv access
system of the present invention is compatible with anv mechanical. electronic,
or pneumatic
27


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCT/US99/07900
lock control which operates in response to a command signal from a
photoelectronic element.

Optoelectronic locking systems utilizing biometric identifiers are well known
in the art. U.S.
Patent 5.138.468 (Barbenell) discloses a kevless holographic lock. and U.S.
Patent 4,876,725
(Tomko) discloses an optical fingerprint verification system.

The stylus 2 has a special sensing grip 4 to fit the hand and enable a good
reading. The
cross-section of the stylus 2 is generally rectangular with rounded corners.
and the print
surfaces for the thumb and index ftnger are slightly recessed and concave.

In one variation, the biometric stylus 2 is attached to a surface or counter
bv means of a
plastic coated hollow tube, containing fiber optic cable therewithin. It is
through the fiber
optic cable that the print images are transmitted to the processor disposed
within the surface
or counter. The sensors are disposed within the stylus 2. In another
variation, the biometric
stylus 2 is portable. While the sensors are also disposed within the stylus 2,
the signals of the
prints are transmitted to the processor for conversion and storage. The prints
of the thumb
and index finger are preserved in the systems processor for as references for
subsequent
comparisons. The goods and service providers have a similar stylus 2 which is
used by the
guest to confirm identification and access the credit account.

The biometric stvlus 2 also has applications beyond hotel and casino
applications. Some of
these applications include in any point-of-sale transaction. in the sales of
controlled
substances (guns. liquor, medicines), on-site in banks to enable account
access, driver's
licenses renewals. and to confirm the identity of all test-takers.

Some advantages of a biometric stylus 2 in these other applications include
that it is more
secure for identification purposes than driver's license or credit cards, and
it can be used even
if an alias is signed since the print is beine compared and not the text of
what is written.
Access to a guest suite is enabled bv the svstem of the present invention when
the guest
grasps a door handle and rotates the handle, identification is confinned once
the door handle
is grasped. Most hotel rooms have a latch-type door for room access. When the
guest wants
access to his room. he gTasps the latch handle with his thumb in a preset
location. generally
the top of the cylinder attaching the latch portion to the door. He applies
pressure to the latch
portion and the thumb print is read bv an optical sensor. The computer seeks a
match the

28


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCT/US99/07900
thumb print of the person who has registered access to the room. If
identification is
confirmed. room access is enabled (see FIGURE 15). In a similar manner. FIGURE
16
discloses the biometric prints captured during an application for a gasoline
service station
card can be used to conftrm identity while the customer is filling his tank.

The engagement member is configured to enable a biometric print to be sensed
upon a
manual contact with the engagement member. The engagement member is
repositioned when
a manual force is applied in a clockwise direction. The engagement member
includes one or
more print areas that are transparent. the print areas enabling the
optoelectronic sensors to
read and analvze the print. The engagement member enables room entrv through a
door knob
or latch. a vehicle door (see 19B).

When a person seeks access into the restricted area, the person applies a
manual force to an
engagement member. The force can be a push for a push button or digital key,
or a rotational
twist for a door knob, or door latch. Contact of the person's hand with the
engagement
member is required.

Whenever an engagement member. like a door knob or latch is opened by the
application of
even moderate to light manual force. more than one print is needed to secure
the member
within the hand of the person seeking entry. The thumbprint. the print of the
index fmger
and even some of the other prints are read and preserved for subsequent
comparison. The
hotel employee assigns a room and enters data into the system assigning the
prints of the
guests to each guest room.

Subsequently, when room access is requested. the prints are read when the
latch or door
handle is grasped. One or more sensors is positioned within the engagement
member for
monitoring and preserving new versions of the biometric prints. The data
relative to the
biometric prints are sensed and preserved for subsequent use whenever the
engagement
member is touched.

Initially, the primary print (thumbprint) is scanned to determine if the
reading provides goods
prints for purposes of comparing and matching. If the thumbprint is biurred.
one or more
secondary prints (index fmger. other fingers. palm) are examined. No search is
initiated until
and unless a¾ood print is provided for purposes of comparison.

29


CA 02327580 2000-10-05
WO 99/52060
PCT/US99/07900
The processor compares the new version of the biometric print as against
prints of all those
who are authorized to enter the particular room in search of a match. Entry
into the guest
room is enabled only after the biometric print of the person seeking entry
matches the
biometric print of a person having authorized access.

For applications involving a small number of authorized users (a guest room or
a telephone
or computer terminal within the guest room), if the person requesting access
provides a good
primary print, only the one print is compared and if there is no match there
is no need to read
other prints. If the results are inconclusive. one or more secondary prints
are compared for a
possible match.

The system of the present invention is particularly well-suited for use with a
conventional
door latch mechanism, and FIGURE 1 discloses a first embodiment of the system
of the
present invention for use with a door latch. Such latches are common in homes,
apartments,
business offices, and hotels. To engage the latch, the thumb is positioned in
a circular recess
on the latch handle. the recess being secured to the latch mount, the latch
mount being
normal to the latch handle. The primary prints are the thumb and the index
finger. The hand
engagement mechanism does not turn unless and until identification has been
confirmed.
The contour ponion of the engagement member is recessed and indented to enable
a three-
dimensional scan of each print. If the button is flat and little force is
needed for engagement,
a full reading of enough of the print does not enable confirmation of
identification with
sufficient confidence to enable access.

FIGURE 15 discloses a second preferred embodiment of the engagement member for
the
system of the present invention for use with a door knob. The knob is modified
to include a
plurality of contours for the thumb and fingers when the knob is grasped. The
door knob is
specially contoured and designed to match the contours of the hand when the
door knob is
grasped. the position of the thumb, and fingers are predetermined as the
digits fit into the
individual contours. The resident may choose from a varietv of shapes and
sizes.

The engagement member may be locked into place until guest identification is
confirmed.
The engagement member may also be repositionable prior to identification. but
not engaged
with the release member. Once identification is confirmed and the person is
identified as an


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
authorized entrant, access is enabled. The latter approach provides the svstem
more time to
confirm plaver identification. FIGURE 19A a simplified logic diagram for
biometric room
entrv.

Also, push-pull door knobs (not shown) are becoming increasingly common,
particularly
with older people who have difficulty completing a secure grip 4 and applying
sufficient
force to enable entry. For all practical purposes the principles of the
present invention are
fully applicable to these door knobs and the sensors are positioned within the
knob to
correspond with the appropriate hand force or motion used to engage such
doors, the pulling
or pushing motion.

In a similar manner. the system of the present invention is configured to
enable a plaver to
engage any slot machine on the premises purely by biometric means. A lever-
type slot match
operates similar to the latch-type hotel door described above. The player
grasps the handle
and pulls it forward, the thumb being placed on a preset location on the
lever. An optical
sensor reads the print and seeks a match with all registered prints in the
system. Once
identification has been confirmed, and the available account balance is
sufficient to cover the
play. the rollers in the slot machine are engages and play is enabled. The
biometric identifier
ensures that the player making the wager is the player to whom access to the
credit account is
enabled. The biometric identifier prevents any unauthorized. If the player
wins. the credit
balance is increased and if the player loses the credit balance is decreased.
If the slot
machine is of the push button variety, the player requests play at the machine
by pressing the
push button.

Also. the system enables a player to participate in any table game on the
premises, either
while at the table or from a remote location. While the principles of the
present invention are
applicable to all games played within a casino (such as roulette, craps,
baccarat), reference in
this specification is made primarily to blackjack for purposes of illustration
only. The player
requests access to his credit account by pressing the push buttons on the
player station. An
optical sensor reads the print and seeks a match with all registered prints in
the system. Once
identification has been confirmed, and the available credit balance in the
player's credit
account is sufficient to cover the play, play is enabled. If the plaver wins.
the credit balance
is increased and if the player loses the credit balance is decreased.
Identification is confirmed
prior to each hand by biometric means.

31


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCT/US99/07900
Unless the plaver changes the wager amount after each gaming unit, the same
wager is
entered for the next eaming unit. However, the player needs to press an
"AGAIN" button
before each ¾aming unit to confirm that the player still physically remains at
the player
position (see FIGURE 14). FIGURES 13A through 13D disclose a simplified a
logic
sequence for a roulette game showing the gaming system from initial clearance
for a player to
final withdrawal of the player from the game for use with the svstems of 11A
and 11B.

The system enables a guest to make any on-site purchase, at a restaurant,
lounge. boutique
shop. or the like and access the credit balance registered with the complex.
The suest grasps
a biometric stylus 2 similar to the implement used at registration to enter
the print of the
index fmger and thumb. An optical sensor reads the thumb and index-fmger print
from the
implement and seeks a match with all registered prints in the system. Once
identification has
been confirmed, and the available credit balance in the guest's credit account
is sufficient to
cover the purchase. the purchase is made and the credit balance is decreased
by the amount of
the purchase. Alternately, the guest submits a finger or thumbprint at the
point-of-sale
through conventional sensors to confirm identification.

The security access system has numerous applications, entry into any private
area;
replacement for any PIN: telephone handset and related off-site purchases: and
computer
keyboard and related off-site purchases. The system can also be incorporated
into process
control environment where security is required. The security access system
enables
authorized access to a restricted area and a credit balance and comprises an
engagement
member, one or more sensors, a processor, and a security access member.

A distinction is made between applications involving the matching of prints of
the guest
requesting access as against a limited number of authorized entrants (guest
room access) and
those applications where the prints of the guest requesting access are
compared against a
large number of guests in the system (slot and table play in a casino). While
both instances
require a comparison with known authorized entrants, the former comprises a
much smaller
pool and processing is greatly simplified. In the latter, the central
processor needs to process
a considerably more data. and search strategies are used to streamline the
search.

For example. in applications involving slot machine access. the search
compares the prints of
the plaver seeking entrv with ali registered guests. Initially, the prints of
the euest seeking
32


CA 02327580 2000-10-05

WO 99/52060 PCTIUS99/07900
entry are compared with the player who last played this slot machine. Absent a
match, the
prints are compared with other players playing adjacent machines. Absent a
match, the prints
are compared with all players in the general area within the last few minutes.
Eventually, the
pool is expanded until all registered guests have been screened for a match.
To improve
efficiency, the prints can be sorted by types and styles that are well known
in the art. The
pool is gradually expanded in logical incremental steps. With each gradual
expansion,
previously checked prints can be dropped so that they are not rechecked. This
area is
continually expanded until a match is found or the search has been completed.

The svstem of the present invention is readily adaptable to off-site purchases
and other
applications involving the telephone or the kevboard of a computer (not
shown). It often
becomes necessary to conSrm positively the identity of the person on the other
end of the
telephone. For off-site purchases by phone, it is important to confirm the
identify of the
person making the purchase. Also, many phones now have caller ID where the
person
receiving the incoming call can read the caller's phone number before
answering the call. If
the caller uses the engagement member of the present invention, the person
receiving the call
can also identifv the caller.

For the handie or handset of a telephone. the primary prints are the thumb,
the index fmger,
and the middle fmger. In another embodiment, the optical sensors can also be
positioned
relative to any of the digital keys on the phone and confirm identification.
This approach is
useful in applications involving a smaller pool of possible users since only
one print is read.
The system of the present invention when used in applications involving
keypads and
computer keyboards includes a modified keyboard with the sensors positioned
either relative
to an existing key or a special biometric push button having a recess to
enable a three-
dimensional print (see FIGURE 10). When one or more keys are pressed, the
prints of the
user are read to confirm that entry is authorized.

The optical sensors can also be positioned relative to any of the digital keys
on the keyboard
and confirm identification. A smaller pool of users is needed since only one
print is read.
However, keyboard sensors can be useful in instances where the caller's phone
number is
read and there are only a limited number of people authorized from that number
as with a
modem. Also, keyboard sensors can be used in combination with PIN's to provide
increased
security.

33


CA 02327580 2008-02-29

Preferably, multiple biometric prints are used to confirm identification.
Secondary
biometrics include not only fmgerprints. thumbprints. and palm prints. but
also speech and
voice recogtridon. and facial readings (retinal scans. infrared facial
readings, feature spacings,
and the like). For example, to enter a guest room, a parallel system may
include a recorded
message asking "Who's there?" The response is recorded through a speaker and
voice
recognition is used to identify the speaker. Speech recognition can also be
used to monitor
the content of the response. Also, facial imaging scanners are disposed within
the doors to
guest rooms and in overhead cameras with mirrors in the casinos for use as
secondary
biometrics. All unauthorized biometric prints can be preserved for law
enforcement purposes
to assist in identifying and convicting burglars and thieves.

The system is also applicable to.resort hotel complexes that do not include
slot machines,
tables gaming, and other type of gambling activity. Similarly, the principles
of the present
invention are also applicable to standalone casinos that do not have guest
rooms. Registration
can occur for a standalone casino either off-site with pre-authorized third
parties or with the
casino.

It is evident that many alternatives, modifications, and variations of the
identification
confirmation system of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled
in the art in
light of the disclosure herein. It is intended that the metes and bounds of
the present
invention be detemzined by the appended claims rather than by the language of
the above
specification, and that all such altematives, modifications, and variations
which form a
conjointly cooperative equivalent are intended to be included within the
spirit and scope of
these claims.

34

A single figure which represents the drawing illustrating the invention.

For a clearer understanding of the status of the application/patent presented on this page, the site Disclaimer , as well as the definitions for Patent , Administrative Status , Maintenance Fee  and Payment History  should be consulted.

Admin Status

Title Date
Forecasted Issue Date 2009-01-27
(86) PCT Filing Date 1999-04-07
(87) PCT Publication Date 1999-10-14
(85) National Entry 2000-10-05
Examination Requested 2003-12-03
(45) Issued 2009-01-27
Lapsed 2018-04-09

Payment History

Fee Type Anniversary Year Due Date Amount Paid Paid Date
Filing $300.00 2000-10-05
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 2 2001-04-09 $100.00 2001-04-04
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 3 2002-04-08 $100.00 2002-01-23
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 4 2003-04-07 $100.00 2003-04-04
Request for Examination $400.00 2003-12-03
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 5 2004-04-07 $200.00 2004-02-13
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 6 2005-04-07 $200.00 2005-03-08
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 7 2006-04-07 $200.00 2006-04-07
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 8 2007-04-10 $200.00 2007-04-10
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 9 2008-04-07 $200.00 2008-04-04
Final $300.00 2008-11-13
Filing an Amendment after allowance $400.00 2008-11-13
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 10 2009-04-07 $250.00 2009-04-07
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 11 2010-04-07 $250.00 2010-04-01
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 12 2011-04-07 $250.00 2011-04-07
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 13 2012-04-09 $250.00 2012-04-05
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 14 2013-04-08 $250.00 2013-04-08
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 15 2014-04-07 $450.00 2014-04-07
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 16 2015-04-07 $450.00 2015-03-17
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 17 2016-04-07 $450.00 2016-04-01
Current owners on record shown in alphabetical order.
Current Owners on Record
BLACK, GERALD R.
Past owners on record shown in alphabetical order.
Past Owners on Record
None
Past Owners that do not appear in the "Owners on Record" listing will appear in other documentation within the application.

To view selected files, please enter reCAPTCHA code :




Filter Download Selected in PDF format (Zip Archive)
Document
Description
Date
(yyyy-mm-dd)
Number of pages Size of Image (KB)
Description 2008-11-13 36 1,814
Claims 2000-10-05 6 189
Representative Drawing 2008-06-03 1 4
Abstract 2000-10-05 1 50
Cover Page 2001-01-31 1 41
Description 2000-10-05 34 1,798
Claims 2006-11-14 5 160
Claims 2008-02-29 5 166
Description 2008-02-29 34 1,754
Representative Drawing 2009-01-13 1 6
Cover Page 2009-01-13 2 48
Prosecution-Amendment 2003-12-03 1 28
Prosecution-Amendment 2008-11-24 1 11
PCT 2000-10-05 2 86
Prosecution-Amendment 2000-10-05 1 18
Prosecution-Amendment 2001-04-02 31 741
Correspondence 2003-05-15 1 15
Prosecution-Amendment 2007-08-31 3 85
Fees 2001-04-04 1 32
Fees 2006-04-07 1 39
Prosecution-Amendment 2006-11-14 6 187
Fees 2007-04-10 1 40
Prosecution-Amendment 2008-02-29 13 455
PCT 2008-05-13 3 115
PCT 2000-10-06 4 164
Correspondence 2008-11-13 2 51
Prosecution-Amendment 2008-11-13 6 210
Fees 2009-04-07 1 200
Fees 2012-04-05 1 163
Correspondence 2018-02-05 1 32
Correspondence 2018-03-09 2 46