Canadian Patents Database / Patent 2746649 Summary

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(12) Patent Application: (11) CA 2746649
(54) English Title: FOOTWEAR INSOLE FOR HIGH HEEL SHOES
(54) French Title: PREMIERE DE PROPRETE POUR CHAUSSURES A TALONS HAUTS
(51) International Patent Classification (IPC):
  • A43B 7/22 (2006.01)
  • A43B 17/02 (2006.01)
(72) Inventors :
  • CAPPAERT, JANE M. (United States of America)
  • HOWLETT, HAROLD A. (United States of America)
  • YANG, PHILIP C. (United States of America)
  • LUNDY, CHARLES E., JR. (United States of America)
(73) Owners :
  • BAYER CONSUMER CARE AG (Switzerland)
(71) Applicants :
  • MSD CONSUMER CARE, INC. (United States of America)
(74) Agent: NORTON ROSE FULBRIGHT CANADA LLP/S.E.N.C.R.L., S.R.L.
(45) Issued:
(86) PCT Filing Date: 2009-12-10
(87) PCT Publication Date: 2010-06-17
Examination requested: 2014-11-28
(30) Availability of licence: N/A
(30) Language of filing: English

(30) Application Priority Data:
Application No. Country/Territory Date
12/334,090 United States of America 2008-12-12

English Abstract





Disclosed is a footwear insole (1) for increasing
comfort in high heel shoes by providing a base layer (2) extending
from a heel to a forefoot of a foot, and a raised portion (4)
prominent from the top of the base layer and situated substantially
under an arch of the foot, in which the raised portion is
configured to increase support of the plantar fascia of the foot.





French Abstract

L'invention concerne une première de propreté (1) destinée à améliorer le confort des chaussures à talons hauts en fournissant une couche de base (2) s'étendant du talon à l'avant-pied du pied, et une partie élevée (4) saillant du haut de la couche de base et située sensiblement sous la voute plantaire du pied, où la partie élevée est conçue pour augmenter le support de l'aponévrose plantaire du pied.


Note: Claims are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.




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What Is Claimed Is:


1. A removable insole for high heel shoes, comprising:
a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and a
forefoot region;
and a raised portion substantially in the arch region configured
to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high
heel shoe in contact with the insole.

2. The insole of claim 1 wherein the raised portion is configured to support
the plantar fascia distal to the calcaneus of the foot.

3. The insole of claim 1 wherein the raised portion is configured
substantially
centrally between the medial and lateral arch of a foot when the foot is in
contact with the insole.

4. The insole of claim 1, wherein the insole is a non-planar structure.

5. The insole of claim 1, wherein the base layer comprises polyurethane gel.
6. The insole of claim 1, wherein the base layer comprises an SEBS gel.

7. The insole of claim 1, wherein the raised portion comprises polyurethane
gel.

8. The insole of claim 1, wherein the raised portion comprises SEBS gel.
9. The insole of claim 1, wherein the raised portion comprises a material
having a softer durometer than the base layer.

10. The insole of claim 1, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000 durometer
between about 58 and about 74.




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11. The insole of claim 10, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer of about 66.

12. The insole of claim 1, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer between about 22 to about 38

13. The insole of claim 12, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer of about 30.

14. The insole of claim 1, wherein the raised portion is configured to
lengthen
the heel platform of the shoe.

15. The insole of claim 1, wherein the base layer includes an indent in the
heel region.

16. A high heel shoe comprising an insole comprising:
a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and a
forefoot region;
and a raised portion substantially in the arch region configured
to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high
heel shoe.

17. The high heel shoe of claim 16, wherein the insole is a removable insole.
18. The high heel shoe of claim 16, wherein the insole is integrated into the
shoe.

19. A method for increasing comfort in high heel shoes, the method
comprising incorporating in the high heel shoe an insole comprising a
base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and a forefoot
region and a raised portion substantially in the arch region configured




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to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high
heel shoe.

20. The method of claim 19, wherein the insole is a removable insole.

21. The method of claim 19, wherein the insole is integrated into the shoe.
22. The method of claim 19, wherein the base layer comprises polyurethane
gel.

23. The method of claim 19, wherein the base layer comprises an SEBS gel.
24. The method of claim 19, wherein the raised portion comprises
polyurethane gel.

25. The method of claim 19, wherein the raised portion comprises SEBS gel.
26. The method of claim 19, wherein the raised portion comprises a material
having a softer durometer than the base layer.

27. The method of claim 19, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer between about 58 and about 74.

28. The method of claim 19, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer of about 66.

29. The method of claim 19, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer between about 22 to about 38

30. The method of claim 19, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer of about 30.




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31. A method for increasing stability during heel strike when walking in high
heel shoes, the method comprising incorporating in the high heel shoe an
insole comprising a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and a
forefoot region and a raised portion substantially in the arch region
configured
to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high
heel
shoe.

32. The method of claim 31, wherein the insole is a removable insole.

33. The method of claim 31, wherein the insole is integrated into the shoe.
34. The method of claim 31, wherein the base layer comprises polyurethane
gel.

35. The method of claim 31, wherein the base layer comprises an SEBS gel.
36. The method of claim 31, wherein the raised portion comprises
polyurethane gel.

37. The method of claim 31, wherein the raised portion comprises SEBS gel.
38. The method of claim 31, wherein the raised portion comprises a material
having a softer durometer than the base layer.

39. The method of claim 31, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer between about 58 and about 74.

40. The method of claim 39, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer of about 66.

41. The method of claim 31, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer between about 22 to about 38




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42. The method of claim 41, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer of about 30.

43. A method for increasing stability of landing of a foot when walking in a
high heel shoe, the method comprising incorporating in the high heel shoe an
insole comprising a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and a
forefoot region and a raised portion substantially in the arch region
configured
to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high
heel
shoe, whereby the raised portion lengthens a heel platform thereby increasing
the stability of the landing of the foot.

44. The method of claim 43, wherein the insole is a removable insole.

45. The method of claim 43 wherein the insole is integrated into the shoe.
46. The method of claim 43, wherein the base layer comprises polyurethane
gel.

47. The method of claim 43, wherein the base layer comprises an SEBS gel.
48. The method of claim 43, wherein the raised portion comprises
polyurethane gel.

49. The method of claim 43, wherein the raised portion comprises SEBS gel.
50. The method of claim 43, wherein the raised portion comprises a material
having a softer durometer than the base layer.

51. The method of claim 43, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer between about 58 and about 74.




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52. The method of claim 51 wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer of about 66.

53. The method of claim 43, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer between about 22 to about 38.

54. The method of claim 53 wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer of about 30.
55. A method for reducing pressure exerted on a forefoot when in
high heel shoes, the method comprising incorporating in the high heel
shoe an insole comprising a base layer comprising a heel region, an
arch region and a forefoot region and a raised portion substantially in
the arch region configured to support the plantar fascia of a foot when
the foot is inserted in a high heel shoe shifting body weight back to the
heel by the raised portion, thereby reducing pressure in the forefoot.
56. The method of claim 55, wherein the insole is a removable insole.

57. The method of claim 55, wherein the insole is integrated into the shoe.
58. The method of claim 55, wherein the base layer comprises polyurethane
gel.

59. The method of claim 55, wherein the base layer comprises an SEBS gel.
60. The method of claim 55, wherein the raised portion comprises
polyurethane gel.

61. The method of claim 55, wherein the raised portion comprises SEBS gel.
62. The method of claim 55, wherein the raised portion comprises a material
having a softer durometer than the base layer.




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63. The method of claim 55, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer between about 58 and about 74.

64. The method of claim 63, wherein the base layer has a Shore 000
durometer of about 66.

65. The method of claim 55, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer between about 22 to about 38

66. The method of claim 65, wherein the raised portion has a Shore 000
durometer of about 30.

Note: Descriptions are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.


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FOOTWEAR INSOLE FOR HIGH HEEL SHOES
Field of the Invention

[ 0001] The present invention relates to footwear insoles for increasing
comfort in high heel shoes, and methods for using the insoles for increasing
comfort in high heel shoes.

Background
[ 0 0 02 ] High heel shoes with a heel height of approximately 1.5 inches
or more may create changes in body posture, gait, foot pressures, ankle
position, etc. during walking. Some of these changes have been well
documented.

[ 0003 ] For example, increased heel height shifts a body's center of
mass forward, mainly due to an increase in forward trunk lean. This shift of
the body's center of mass forward has been shown to increase forefoot
pressure and loading and has been associated with many foot problems for
wearers of high heel shoes.

[00041 In addition, increased heel height causes vertical ground
reaction forces to increase during heel strike and forefoot push-off, and
stance
time to decrease, thereby resulting in increased overall shock applied to the
body during walking. Further, stability during the initial heel strike is
reduced
due to the higher landing height and the narrower landing platform of the
heel.
[ 0 0 0 51 Moreover, increased heel height places the ankle in a more
plantar flexed position. This forces the arch of the foot to be more rigid,
preventing movement through the arch's normal range of pronation. Thus,
the plantar flexed position of the ankle diminishes the body's natural ability
to
cushion through pronation the shock applied to the body during walking.

[ 0 0 0 61 Footwear insoles are generally inserted into shoes, in order to
provide added cushioning or support for the wearer of the shoes. The insoles


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may be removable and reusable, and they may be one-size-fits-all, specified
shoe sizes, or custom-sized to the wearer.

[0007] Insoles offering additional cushioning by providing one or more
cushioning layers to the soles of the wearer's shoes are known in the art.
These insoles are generally used to decrease the impact felt by the wearer
during walking, jogging, running, or other activities.

[ 0008 ] In addition at least one example of an insole device said to be
adapted for use in high heel shoes is described in U.S. Patent No. 7,322,132,
which, unlike the subject invention, has a crescent shaped apex position to
lie
under a calcaneus of the foot in a rear region, an apex lying under the second
and third metatarsals of the foot in a forward region, and a middle region
thinner than the apices of the rear and forward regions.

[0009] Thus there is a need for an insole that is uniquely designed to
be worn in high heel shoes and that provides cushioning for comfort but in
addition provides additional comfort and stability by its ability to transfer
body
weight towards the heel of the foot.

Summary
[ 0010 ] The invention described herein addresses these objectives by
providing a footwear insole for increasing comfort that is specifically
adapted
to be worn in high heel shoes.

[ 0 0111 Thus the invention provides a removable insole for high heel
shoes, comprising a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and
a forefoot region; and a raised portion substantially in the arch region
configured to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted
in a
high heel shoe in contact with the insole.

[ 0012 ] In a non-lirriiting embodiment of the invention, the base layer
comprises polyurethane gel.


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[ 0013 ] In an alternative non-limiting embodiment of the invention, the
base layer comprises styrenic gel materials, in particular styrene-ethylene-
butadiene-styrene (SEBS) gel.

[ 00141 In an alternative non-limiting embodiment of the invention, the
raised portion comprises a polyurethane gel having a softer durometer than
the base layer.

[ 0 015 ] In an alternative non-limiting embodiment of the invention, the
raised portion comprises SEBS gel having a softer durometer than the base
layer.

[0016] In an alternative non-limiting embodiment of the invention, the
base layer includes an indent under the heel of the foot.

[ 0 017 ] The invention also provides a high heel shoe comprising an
insole comprising a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region and a
forefoot region; and a raised portion substantially in the arch region
configured
to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high
heel
shoe.

[ 0 0181 In a non-limiting embodiment of the invention, the insole is
removable from the high heel shoe.

[ 0 0191 In another non-limiting embodiment of the invention, the insole is
integrated into the high heel shoe.

[ 0 02 01 The invention further provides a method for increasing comfort
in high heel shoes, the method comprising incorporating in the high heel shoe
an insole comprising a base layer comprising a heel region, an arch region
and a forefoot region and a raised portion substantially in the arch region
configured to support the plantar fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted
in a
high heel shoe.

[ 0 021 ] The invention also provides a method for increasing stability
during heel strike when walking in high heel shoes, the method comprising
incorporating in the high heel shoe an insole comprising a base layer
comprising a heel region, an arch region and a forefoot region and a raised


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portion substantially in the arch region configured to support the plantar
fascia
of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high heel shoe.

[ 0022 ] The invention also provides a method for increasing stability of
landing of a foot when walking in a high heel shoe, the method comprising
incorporating in the high heel shoe an insole comprising a base layer
comprising a heel region, an arch region and a forefoot region and a raised
portion substantially in the arch region configured to support the plantar
fascia
of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high heel shoe, whereby the raised
portion lengthens a heel platform thereby increasing the stability of the
landing
of the foot.

[0023] The invention further provides a method for reducing pressure
exerted on a forefoot when in high heel shoes, the method comprising
incorporating in the high heel shoe an insole comprising a base layer
comprising a heel region, an arch region and a forefoot region and a raised
portion substantially in the arch region configured to support the plantar
fascia
of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high heel shoe shifting body weight
back to the heel by the raised portion, thereby reducing pressure in the
forefoot.

[ 002 4 ] Other features and aspects of the present invention will become
more fully apparent from the following brief description of the drawings, the
detailed description of the non-limiting embodiments, the appended claims
and the accompanying drawings.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0025] FIG. 1A is a top view of an embodiment of an exemplary
footwear insole for high heel shoes, in accordance with the present invention.
[ 002 6 ] FIG. 1 B is a side view of the embodiment of the exemplary
footwear insole for high heel shoes, in accordance with the present invention.
[ 0027 ] FIG. 1 C is a bottom view of the embodiment of the exemplary
footwear insole for high heel shoes, in accordance with the present invention.


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[ 0028 ] FIG. 2A is a cross-sectional view, along line A-A' shown in FIG.
1A, of the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole for high heel shoes,
in accordance with the present invention.

[ 0 02 91 FIG. 2B is a cross-sectional view, along line B-B' shown in FIG.
1A, of the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole for high heel shoes,
in accordance with the present invention.

[0030] FIG. 2C is a cross-sectional view, along line C-C' shown in FIG.
1A, of the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole for high heel shoes,
in accordance with the present invention.

[ 00311 FIG. 2D is a front view of the embodiment of the exemplary
footwear insole for high heel shoes, in accordance with the present invention.
[0032] FIG. 3A shows group means data for maximum force for 1.5
inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with
insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0033 ] FIG. 3B shows group means data for peak pressure for 1.5 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention.

[ 00341 FIG. 3C shows group means data for contact time for 1.5 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention.

[0035] FIG. 3D shows group means data for contact area for 1.5 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention.

[0036] FIG. 3E shows group means data for maximum force for 3.0
inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with
insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0037 ] FIG. 3F shows group means data for peak pressure for 3.0 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention.


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[ 0038 ] FIG. 3G shows group means data for contact time for 3.0 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention.

[ 0039] FIG. 3H shows group means data for contact area for 3.0 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention.

[ 0040 ] FIG. 4A shows a bar graph of group means data for maximum
force for 1.5 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel
shoes with insoles according to the present invention.

[ 00411 FIG. 4B shows a bar graph of group means data for peak
pressure for 1.5 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel
shoes with insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0042 ] FIG. 4C shows a bar graph of group means data for contact time
for 1.5 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes
with
insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0 0 4 31 FIG. 4D shows a bar graph of group means data for contact
area for 1.5 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel
shoes with insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0044 ] FIG. 5A shows a bar graph of group means data for maximum
force for 3.0 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel
shoes with insoles according to the present invention.

[0045] FIG. 5B shows a bar graph of group means data for peak
pressure for 3.0 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel
shoes with insoles according to the present invention.

[ 004 61 FIG. 5C shows a bar graph of group means data for contact time
for 3.0 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes
with
insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0 0 4 7 ] FIG. 5D shows a bar graph of group means data for contact
area for 3.0 inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel
shoes with insoles according to the present invention.


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[ 004 8 ] FIG. 6A is a pressure map of feet wearing high heel shoes with
no insole.

[0049] FIG. 6B is a pressure map of feet wearing high heel shoes with
the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole for high heel shoes, in
accordance with the present invention.

[0050] FIG. 7A is another pressure map of feet wearing high heel
shoes with no insole.

[ 005 ]_ ] FIG. 7B is another pressure map of feet wearing high heel
shoes with the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole for high heel
shoes, in accordance with the present invention.

Detailed Description of the Embodiments

[0052] Figures 1 and 2 depict an embodiment of an exemplary footwear
insole 1 for high heel shoes, in accordance with the present invention.
Although the Figures show a right-footed embodiment of the exemplary
footwear insole 1, it is to be understood that a left-footed embodiment of the
exemplary footwear insole 1 would be a mirror image of the Figures shown.
[ 00531 Figures 1A to 1 C, and 2D show different views of an
embodiment of an exemplary footwear insole 1 for high heel shoes. FIG. 1A
is a top view, FIG. 'I B is a side view, FIG. 1 C is a bottom view, and FIG.
2D is
a front view of the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole 1. Figures
1A, 1 B, 1C, and 2D show a base layer 2 extending between a heel region 3
and a forefoot region 5 of the insole 1. The base layer 2 may extend from the
region 3 underneath the heel to a region 5 underneath the forefoot but
preferably not underneath the toes of the foot. However, it is understood that
in use with smaller feet, e.g., Women's (US) size 5 and smaller, there may be
some contact between the base layer and the toes. Preferably, the base layer
2 may have a length of 190.0 4.0 mm, and a width in the forefoot region 5 of
64.0 3.0 mm. The base layer 2 may be made of polyurethane gel, SEBS
gel or any other similar material. In certain embodiments the base layer will
have a Shore 000 durometer of between about 58 to about 74, and preferably


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about 66. Optionally, the base layer 2 may include an indent or heel cup (not
shown) in the heel region 3, into which the heel of the foot may fit.

[ 0 0 541 Figures 1 A, 1 B, and 2D also show a raised portion 4 in the arch
region prominent from the top surface of the base layer 2, i.e., the surface
in
contact with the bottom of a foot when in use. The raised portion 4 is
configured so as to be approximately underneath the arch of the foot, more
particularly in contact with the central area of the arch region of the foot
so as
to support the plantar fascia when the foot is in the high heel shoe.
Preferably
raised portion 4 is configured so as to support the plantar fascia distal to
the
calcaneus. The raised portion 4 may be made of polyurethane gel, SEBS gel
or any other similar material. Preferably, raised portion 4 has a softer
durometer range than the base layer 2. In certain embodiments raised portion
4 will have a Shore 000 durometer of between about 22 to about 38, and
preferably about 30. In certain embodiments raised portion 4 has a compliant,
tactile feel and may conform to the shape of the arch of the foot, preferably
substantially under the plantar fascia of the foot, when the foot is inserted
in
the shoe. Further, raised portion 4 is configured to allow the foot to sink
into
the insole 1 and increase stability during heel strike.

[ 0055 ] Figures 2A, 2B, and 2C show different cross-sectional views of
the embodiment of the exemplary footwear insole 1 for high heel shoes.
Figure 2A shows a cross-sectional view in the heel region 3 along line A-A'
shown in Figure 1A, Figure 2B shows a cross-sectional view through the arch
region and raised portion 4 along line B-B' shown in Figure 1A, and Figure 2C
shows a cross-sectional view in the forefoot region 5 along line C-C' shown in
Figure 1A.

[ 0056] In the cross-sectional view of Figure 2A, the base layer 2 has an
approximately uniform thickness in the heel region 3. Preferably, the base
layer 2 may have a thickness of 1.7 1.0 mm in the heel region 3. If the heel
region 3 includes an optional indent or heel cup (not shown), the cross-
sectional view of Figure 2A may include a corresponding varying thickness of
the base layer 2 in the heel region 3. In the cross-sectional view of Figure
2C,


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the base layer 2 also has an approximately uniform thickness underneath the
forefoot region 5. Preferably, the base layer 2 may have a thickness of 1.7
0.5 mm in the forefoot region 5.

[ 0 0 5 7 ] In the cross-sectional view of Figure 2B, the base layer 2 has an
approximately uniform thickness underneath the arch of the foot. The raised
portion 4 is prominent from the top surface of the base layer 2 and provides
an increased thickness of the insole 1. The raised portion is preferably
situated substantially centrally between the medial and lateral arch of a foot
when the foot is in contact with the insole. Preferably, the raised portion 4
may have a maximum thickness of 6.7 1.5 mm in the area of the crest 6.

[ 00581 By providing increased thickness of the insole 1 centrally
underneath the arch region of the foot by raised portion 4 according to the
present invention, the insole 1 creates more contact between the foot and
shoe in the area of the plantar fascia of the foot when wearing high heel
shoes. In addition, the insole 1 according to the present invention may reduce
pressures under the ball of the foot in the forefoot region 5 when wearing
high
heel shoes.

[0059] Further, the insole 1 according to the present invention may
have the effect of lengthening the heel platform and/or cupping the heel to
increase the stability of landing. In addition, the insole 1 may allow the
body's
weight to be shifted back towards the heel region 3 to relieve excess pressure
in the forefoot region 5, by increasing the heel landing platform and/or arch
contact. Moreover, the insole 1 may increase arch contact by the prominent
raised portion 4 during walking to facilitate a more natural walking stride.
Furthermore, the insole 1 may improve posture by increasing comfort in high
heel shoes, according to one or a combination of the above features.

[0060] In a preferred non-limiting embodiment of the present invention,
the insole 1 may be a 3/4 length insole which extends longitudinally forward
from the heel region 3 to a position in the forefoot region 5 rearward of the
toes of the foot. The insole 1 may include a base layer 2 and a raised portion
4 prominent from the top surface of the base layer 2 substantially underneath


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the arch of the foot. In addition, the raised portion 4 may include a crest 6
that
fits into the arch of the foot, particularly in contact with the arch region
of the
foot to support the plantar fascia, when the foot is in the high heel shoe.
Preferably raised portion 4 is configured so as to support the plantar fascia
distal to the calcaneus. The base layer 2 may be made of polyurethane gel,
and the arch bump 4 may be made of a polyurethane gel or SEBS gel or
similar material softer than the material of the base layer 2. Further, the
heel
region 3 may include an indent or heel cup into which the heel of the foot may
fit. The insole 1 may increase maximum force, peak pressure, and contact
area in the arch of the foot while reducing maximum force and peak pressures
in the heel region 3 and the forefoot region 5.

[ 00 61] A method of using an insole 1 for increasing comfort in high heel
shoes may comprise the step of increasing contact with an arch of a foot by a
raised portion 4, in which the insole 1 includes a base layer 2 extending from
a heel region 3 to a forefoot region 5 of the foot, and a raised portion 4
attached to the base layer 2 and situated in the arch region of the insole.

[ 0 0 62 ] The method of using an insole 1 thus also provides a method for
increasing stability during heel strike when walking in high heel shoes.

[ 0 0 63 ] The method of using an insole 1 thus also provides a method for
increasing stability during heel strike when walking in high heel shoes.

[0064] The method of using an insole 1 thus also provides a method for
increasing stability of landing of a foot when walking in a high heel shoe
whereby the raised portion 4 lengthens the heel platform of the shoe thereby
increasing the stability of the landing of the foot.

[ 00 65 ] The method of using the insole thus also provides a method for
reducing pressure exerted on a forefoot when in high heel shoes a raised
portion 4 substantially in the arch region configured to support the plantar
fascia of a foot when the foot is inserted in a high heel shoe shifts body
weight
back to the heel region 3 by the raised portion 4, thereby reducing pressure
in
the forefoot.


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[ 0 0 6 61 Methods of manufacturing insoles from polyurethane or styrenic
gels or similar materials are known in the art. Representative methods are
disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 20060026865 and
references cited therein. The disclosure of that publication is hereby
incorporated in its entirety into the present specification.

Experimental Procedures and Data

[ 0067 ] Embodiments of the exemplary footwear insole 1 for high heel
shoes of the present invention were tested for increasing contact in the arch
of the foot and reducing pressures in the forefoot region 3 of the foot. Ten
female subjects were recruited for evaluation of the exemplary footwear insole
1 for high heel shoes. The subjects were screened based on a number of
criteria including, for example, age, height, weight, foot size, general
health,
and others. In particular, subjects were required to have worn high heel
shoes at least 1.5 inches high for a minimum of three days per week prior to
the study.

[ 0068 ] For each subject, a Novel Electronics Pedar measurement
system was used to measure underfoot pressure. The system consisted of
thin measurement insoles that were placed inside high heel shoes. Data were
collected at 100 Hz, and the measured pressure and contact area output were
used to calculate force. In addition, data were analyzed over the entire foot
and within various sections of the foot.

[ 0 0 6 9 ] Embodiments of the exemplary footwear insole 1 for high heel
shoes were tested in two heel heights: 1.5 inches and 3.0 inches. All trials
were conducted with subjects wearing the same brand and style of high heel
shoes, except for a single subject due to shoe size accommodations.

[ 0 0 7 01 The subjects randomly tested four experimental conditions: 1.5
inch heels with no insoles; 1.5 inch heels with insoles; 3.0 inch heels with
no
insoles; and 3.0 inch heels with insoles. Further, five trials were collected
for
each experimental condition for each subject. A trial consisted of a 20 meter
walk at a self-selected pace.


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[0071] For each condition, the mean and standard deviation of peak
pressure were calculated from the five trials. The two trials furthest from
the
mean were discarded, and the remaining three trials were further analyzed.
For each of the three remaining trials, values for right and left feet were
averaged together and then the three trials for each condition were averaged.
The data were analyzed over the entire foot and within various sections of the
foot. A paired T-test was used to compare group means within each heel
height condition over the total foot and within the various sections of the
foot
(heel, arch, ball of foot, lateral forefoot, first toe, and toes). Statistical
significance level was chosen to be p:5 0.05.

[0072] The data are provided in Figures 3A to 3H. Figure 3A shows
group means data for maximum force for 1.5 inch high heel shoes with no
insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with insoles according to the present
invention. As can be seen from the data, the maximum force at the heel,
lateral forefoot, 1 st toe, and toes decreases while the maximum force at the
arch increases when using exemplary insoles according to the present
invention.

[0073] Figure 3B shows group means data for peak pressure for 1.5
inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with
insoles according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the
peak pressure at the heel, 1st toe, and toes decreases while the peak
pressure at the arch increases when using exemplary insoles according to the
present invention.

[0074] Figure 3C shows group means data for contact time for 1.5 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the contact
time increases at both the heel and the arch when using exemplary insoles
according to the present invention.

[0075] Figure 3D shows group means data for contact area for 1.5 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 1.5 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the contact


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area at the heel decreases while the contact area at the arch increases when
using exemplary insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0 0 7 61 Figure 3E shows group means data for maximum force for 3.0
inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with
insoles according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the
maximum force at the heel, ball, lateral forefoot, 1St toe, and toes decreases
while the maximum force at the arch increases when using exemplary insoles
according to the present invention.

[ 007 7 ] Figure 3F shows group means data for peak pressure for 3.0
inch high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with
insoles according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the
peak pressure at the heel, ball, and toes decreases while the peak pressure
at the arch increases when using exemplary insoles according to the present
invention.

[ 0078 ] Figure 3G shows group means data for contact time for 3.0 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the contact
time decreases at both the heel and the arch when using exemplary insoles
according to the present invention.

[ 0 0 7 91 Figure 3H shows group means data for contact area for 3.0 inch
high heel shoes with no insoles, and 3.0 inch high heel shoes with insoles
according to the present invention. As can be seen from the data, the contact
area at the heel decreases while the contact area at the arch increases when
using exemplary insoles according to the present invention.

[ 0080 ] Figures 4A to 4D, and 5A to 5D graphically represent the data in
Figures 3A to 3H. The asterisks highlighting various data points in Figures 4A
to 4D, and 5A to 5D indicate data points having statistical significance, as
set
forth above. The remaining data points show trends in the data but may not
include enough samples to achieve statistical significance.

[ 0081 ] Figure 4A shows the maximum force group means for 1.5 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3A. These results show a


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statistically significant reduction in maximum force in the toe area of the
foot
when using insoles 1 according to the present invention, as well as a
decrease in maximum force in the heel and an increase in maximum force in
the arch of the foot.

[ 0082 ] Figure 4B shows the peak pressure group means for 1.5 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3B. These results show a
statistically significant reduction in peak pressure in the heel and the toe
area
of the foot when using insoles 1 according to the present invention, as well
as
an increase in peak pressure in the arch of the foot.

[ 0 0 8 31 Figure 4C shows the contact time group means for 1.5 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3C. These results show an
increase in contact time in both the heel and the arch when using insoles 1
according to the present invention.

[ 0 0 8 4 ] Figure 4D shows the contact area group means for 1.5 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3D. These results show a
statistically significant increase in contact area in the arch when using
insoles
1 according to the present invention, as well as a decrease in contact area in
the heel.

[ 0 0 8 51 Figure 5A shows the maximum force group means for 3.0 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3E. These results show a
statistically significant reduction in maximum force in the ball of foot area
and
a statistically significant increase in maximum force in the arch of the foot
when using insoles 1 according to the present invention, as well as decreases
in maximum force in the heel, lateral forefoot, first toe, and toes.

[ 008 61 Figure 5B shows the peak pressure group means for 3.0 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3F. These results show a
decrease in peak pressure in the heel, ball of foot, and toe areas, and an
increase in peak pressure in the arch when using insoles 1 according to the
present invention.

[ 0 0 8 7 ] Figure 5C shows the contact time group means for 3.0 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3G. These results show a


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statistically significant decrease in contact time in the arch when using
insoles
1 according to the present invention, as well as a decrease in contact time in
the heel.

[ 0088 ] Figure 5D shows the contact area group means for 3.0 inch
heels, corresponding to the data of Figure 3H. These results show a
statistically significant increase in contact area in the arch and a
statistically
significant decrease in contact area in the heel when using insoles 1
according to the present invention.

[ 0 0 8 91 Based on the above data and graphs in Figures 3A to 3H, 4A to
4D, and 5A to 5D, exemplary insoles 1 according to the present invention
create a change in the force and pressure dynamic, as well as a change in the
contact dynamic. Generally, maximum force and peak pressure are reduced
in the heel and forefoot regions, whereas maximum force and peak pressure
are increased in the arch area. In addition, contact area is reduced in the
heel
region, whereas contact area is increased in the arch area.

f 0090 ] Moreover, Figures 6A and 6B show one example set of pressure
maps of feet wearing high heel shoes with no insoles (Fig. 6A) and with
exemplary insoles (Fig. 6B), in accordance with the present invention.
Further, Figures 7A and 7B show another example set of pressure maps of
feet wearing high heel shoes with no insoles (Fig. 7A) and with exemplary
insoles (Fig. 7B), in accordance with the present invention. In the pressure
maps of these Figures, pressure is indicated on a scale ranging from relative
low pressure P1 to relative high pressure P6. As can be seen in the Figures,
when using insoles 1 according to the present invention, pressure is
decreased in the forefoot and heel regions of the feet, while pressure is
increased in the arches of the feet. These changes are shown in Figures 6B
and 7B by smaller and fewer areas of high pressure in the forefoot and heel
regions of the feet, and by markedly larger areas of increased pressure in the
arches of the feet. In particular, in Figures 6B and 7B the increase in
pressure under the metatarsals along the lateral side of the foot, in the
region
of the cuboid and distal thereof, demonstrates the effect of the centrally


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located raised portion of the insole as opposed to a normal arch support
which would show pressure in the medial arch.

[ 00 911 Based on the above experimental data and results, significant
positive effects were seen at both heel heights when using insoles 1
according to the present invention. The positive effects were more
pronounced in the 3.0 inch heels than in the 1.5 inch heels. In the 3.0 inch
heels, the results show that maximum force due to body weight was shifted
significantly from the ball of foot to the arch when using insoles 1 according
to
the present invention. In addition, contact area in the arch increased
significantly when using insoles 1 according to the present invention. Thus,
the exemplary insoles 1 achieve a reduction in the force and pressure under
the ball of the foot due to body weight by increasing contact area under the
arch, thereby shifting the body's weight from the ball of the foot to the
arch.

[ 00 921 The foregoing description discloses only non-limiting
embodiments of the present invention. Modification of the above-disclosed
footwear insole for high heel shoes, as well as methods for using the same,
which fall within the scope of the invention, will be readily apparent to
those of
ordinary skill in the art.

[ 0 0 9 31 Accordingly, while the present invention has been disclosed in
connection with the above non-limiting embodiments, it should be understood
that other embodiments may fall within the spirit and scope of the invention,
as defined by the following claims.

A single figure which represents the drawing illustrating the invention.

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Admin Status

Title Date
Forecasted Issue Date Unavailable
(86) PCT Filing Date 2009-12-10
(87) PCT Publication Date 2010-06-17
(85) National Entry 2011-06-10
Examination Requested 2014-11-28
Dead Application 2018-04-12

Payment History

Fee Type Anniversary Year Due Date Amount Paid Paid Date
Filing $400.00 2011-06-10
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 2 2011-12-12 $100.00 2011-06-10
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 3 2012-12-10 $100.00 2012-09-21
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 4 2013-12-10 $100.00 2013-11-22
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 5 2014-12-10 $200.00 2014-11-12
Request for Examination $800.00 2014-11-28
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 6 2015-12-10 $200.00 2015-11-23
Registration of Documents $100.00 2016-03-11
Registration of Documents $100.00 2016-03-11
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 7 2016-12-12 $200.00 2016-11-22
Current owners on record shown in alphabetical order.
Current Owners on Record
BAYER CONSUMER CARE AG
Past owners on record shown in alphabetical order.
Past Owners on Record
BAYER CONSUMER CARE HOLDINGS LLC
MSD CONSUMER CARE, INC.
Past Owners that do not appear in the "Owners on Record" listing will appear in other documentation within the application.

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Abstract 2011-06-10 2 68
Claims 2011-06-10 7 184
Drawings 2011-06-10 12 374
Description 2011-06-10 16 710
Representative Drawing 2011-06-10 1 7
Cover Page 2011-08-15 1 34
Claims 2016-07-27 6 193
Description 2016-07-27 16 710
PCT 2011-06-10 13 451
Correspondence 2011-09-08 3 112
Prosecution-Amendment 2014-11-28 2 73
Prosecution-Amendment 2016-01-27 3 241
Prosecution-Amendment 2016-07-27 12 542
Prosecution-Amendment 2016-10-12 3 202