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Patent 2405642 Summary

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(12) Patent: (11) CA 2405642
(54) English Title: ELECTRIC STRIKE ASSEMBLY
(54) French Title: ENSEMBLE DE GACHE ELECTRIQUE
Status: Expired
Bibliographic Data
(51) International Patent Classification (IPC):
  • E05B 47/00 (2006.01)
(72) Inventors :
  • BASHFORD, ANTHONY J. (Canada)
(73) Owners :
  • DORMAKABA CANADA INC. (Canada)
(71) Applicants :
  • RUTHERFORD CONTROLS INT'L. CORP. (Canada)
(74) Agent: BORDEN LADNER GERVAIS LLP
(74) Associate agent:
(45) Issued: 2009-04-28
(22) Filed Date: 2002-09-27
(41) Open to Public Inspection: 2004-03-27
Examination requested: 2007-09-17
Availability of licence: N/A
(25) Language of filing: English

Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT): No

(30) Application Priority Data: None

Abstracts

English Abstract

The electrically-operated door strike provides rapid and easy selection between fail-safe and fail-secure modes. A keeper is pivotably arranged in a housing. To prevent the keeper from pivoting, the keeper has at least one abutment, which a blocking surface or surfaces of a blocking element either contacts (door locked) or does not contact (door unlocked) when the keeper tries to pivot. The blocking element is movable by a solenoid, between a first (unenergized) position and a second (energized) position. The blocking element and solenoid are mounted in a holder, which in turn is slidably mounted in a housing, for movement between one of two holder positions, namely a fail-secure position and a fail-safe position. In the fail-secure position, the blocking surfaces are opposite the keeper's abutments in the unenergized position, and in the fail-safe position the blocking surfaces are opposite the keeper's abutments only when the actuator is energized. A two-position mode selector, accessible from outside the housing and set at the time of installation, establishes which of the two holder positions is used, i.e. whether the strike is installed in fail-safe or fail- secure mode. In the preferred embodiment, the mode selector is an eccentric, rotatable between two positions 180 degrees apart, and having a pin which engages the holder. A latch monitor arm indicates whether or not the door is latched. A lip bracket engages the housing with a saw-tooth feature, and provides for depth adjustment. The keeper and housing are shaped to prevent intrusion.


French Abstract

La gâche électrique permet une sélection rapide et aisée entre les modes à sécurité intégrée et à fermeture en cas de panne de courant. Un crochet d'arrêt est installé sur pivot dans un boîtier. Pour éviter que le crochet d'arrêt ne pivote, il comporte au moins une butée avec une ou des surfaces de blocage avec laquelle (lesquelles) un élément de blocage entre en contact (porte verrouillée) ou non (porte non verrouillée) quand le crochet d'arrêt tente de pivoter. L'élément de blocage est mobile à l'aide d'un solénoïde, entre une première position (sans énergie) et une seconde position (avec énergie). L'élément de blocage et le solénoïde sont montés sur un support, qui à son tour est monté par coulissement dans un boîtier, pour pouvoir se déplacer entre une des deux positions du support, à savoir une position à fermeture en cas de panne de courant et une position à sécurité intégrée. Dans la position à fermeture en cas de panne de courant, les surfaces de blocage sont opposées à la butée du crochet d'arrêt dans la position sans énergie, et dans la position à sécurité intégrée, les surfaces de blocage sont opposées à la butée du crochet d'arrêt uniquement quand le dispositif de déclenchement fonctionne. Un sélecteur de mode à deux positions, accessible de l'extérieur du boîtier et paramétré au moment de l'installation établit laquelle des deux positions du support est utilisée, c'est-à-dire, si la gâche est installée en mode à sécurité intégrée ou à fermeture en cas de panne de courant. Dans l'exemple préféré, le sélecteur de mode est excentrique, rotatif entre deux positions distantes de 180°, et doté d'une broche qui engrène le support. Un bras de contrôle du loquet indique si la porte est verrouillée. Un support de lèvre engrène le boîtier avec une fonction en dents de scie et permet le réglage de la profondeur. Le crochet d'arrêt et le boîtier sont conçus pour éviter l'intrusion.

Claims

Note: Claims are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.



THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY
OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:

1. An electric strike for a door, comprising:
a housing;
a keeper pivotally arranged in said housing, positioned to prevent withdrawal
of a door latch bolt when prevented from pivoting, and to allow withdrawal of
said door
latch bolt when allowed to pivot;
a holder slidably arranged in said housing;
a blocking element slidably arranged in said holder having blocking surfaces
opposing abutments of said keeper for selectively preventing rotation of said
keeper,
movable between a blocking position wherein rotation of said keeper is
prevented and
a non-blocking position wherein rotation of said keeper is allowed, biased
towards one
of said positions;
a two-position mode selector operable from outside said housing for slidably
moving said holder between a fail-secure and a fail-safe position, said
blocking surfaces
blocking rotation of said keeper when in said biased position when said holder
is in said
fail-secure position, and allowing rotation of said keeper when in said biased
position
when said holder is in said fail-safe position; and
actuation means mounted in said holder for moving said blocking element
away from said biased position, to block or unblock said keeper.

2. An electric strike as in claim 1, wherein said mode selector comprises an
eccentric rotatable through 180 degrees, said eccentric having a pin extending
therefrom engaging a slot in said holder, eccentric motion of said pin thereby
displacing
said holder between two end positions corresponding to the position of said
pin at
opposite ends of 180 degrees of rotation.

3. An electric strike as in claim 1, further comprising means for biasing said
mode selector into whichever of said two positions is selected.

-14-


4. An electric strike as in claim 2, further comprising means for biasing said
mode selector into whichever of said two positions is selected.

5. An electric strike as in claim 4, wherein said means for biasing said mode
selector is a spring positioned to act on said pin in a direction roughly 90
degrees to a
diameter line drawn between end points of said pin's 180 degree travel.

6. An electric strike as in claim 1, further comprising a latch monitor lever
arm
pivotally mounted in said housing, said latch monitor lever arm having an
extension
therefrom with a plate positioned to be depressed when a latch bolt is present
in said
strike, to thereby rotate said latch monitor lever arm from a home position to
which it is
biased, said rotation bringing a cam extending from said latch monitor lever
arm into
gradual contact with a switch button on a microswitch, thereby signalling
whether or not
a latch bolt is present.

7. An electric strike as in claim 1, further comprising a lip bracket
securable to
said housing along an interface at any of a plurality of possible relative
positions, and
a face plate securable to said lip bracket and securable to a door jamb for
installation
of said strike.

8. An electric strike as in claim 7, wherein said interface has complementary
saw-tooth projections from said housing and said lip bracket, said projections
having
mating surfaces which are generally perpendicular to said interface in a
direction to
oppose outward displacement of the housing relative to said lip bracket.

9. An electric strike as in claim 1, wherein said actuation means is a pull-
type
solenoid connected to said blocking element, and said blocking element is
biased away
from said solenoid.

10. An electric strike as in claim 1, wherein said actuation means is a push-
type
solenoid and said blocking element is biased towards said solenoid.

-15-


11. An electric strike as in claim 1, wherein said keeper and said housing are
shaped so as to provide substantially no gap therebetween when said keeper is
in
a home position blocked by said blocking element, and wherein said keeper has
a
lip and said housing has a catch, said lip being positioned to direct any
flexible
inserted item towards said catch, said catch blocking further insertion.

12. An electric strike for a door, comprising:
a housing;
a keeper pivotally arranged in the housing; a holder slidably arranged in the
housing;
a blocking element slidably arranged in the holder, wherein the blocking
element is configured to selectively prevent a rotation of the keeper and
allow the
rotation of the keeper;
a two-position mode selector operable from outside the housing, wherein
the two-position mode selector is configured to selectively move the holder
from a
first position to a second position and from the second position to the first
position;
and
an actuator configured to selectively move the blocking element, wherein
when the holder is in the first position, the blocking member allows the
rotation of
the keeper when the actuator is energized and prevents the rotation of the
keeper
when the actuator is not energized, wherein when the holder is in the second
position, the blocking member prevents the rotation of the keeper when the
actuator is energized and allows the rotation of the keeper when the actuator
is
not energized.

-16-

Description

Note: Descriptions are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.


CA 02405642 2002-09-27
This invention relates to door locking mechanisms, more particularly to
electric door
locking mechanisms commonly known as electric strikes.
Electric strikes, also known as electric door openers, electric releases and
electric
release strikes, are used to control access to buildings or areas. An
actuation means
(e.g. an electrically driven motor or solenoid) is used to either block or
release a
rotatable keeper to either prevent or allow release of a door's latch bolt, to
lock the door
or allow it to be opened.
Typically, electric strikes have two modes, namely a "fail-secure" mode (where
the door
is locked with the power removed, i.e. the actuation means must be triggered
to allow
the door to be opened), and a "fail-safe" mode (where the door is unlocked
with the
power removed, i.e. the actuation means must be triggered to prevent the door
from
being opened). Some strikes on the market have only one-mode capability, i.e.
they are
either fail-secure or fail-safe, while others are dual mode, i.e. the
installer can select
which mode is desired at the time of installation.
One known dual-mode electric strike, for example, available as GEM model GK-
300
and ROFO 2400 series models, has a solenoid mounted on a holder, which is
movable
within the strike housing. A blocking element is directly attached to the
plunger of the
solenoid, to block movement of the keeper when the strike is in its locked
position. A
first screw, reachable from outside the housing, cooperates with a slot in the
housing,
to define the path along which the holder is movable. When the first screw is
tightened,
it fastens the holder to the housing, i.e. the holder cannot move. First and
second holes
are arranged on the housing, to alternately align with a second screw, also
reachable
from outside the housing, so that at each end position along the holder path
of
movement, one of a threaded third or fourth hole, both arranged on the holder,
is
aligned with either the first hole or the second hole, and the second screw
can be
inserted into the appropriate first or second hole and screwed into the
visible third or
fourth hole. The installer can configure the GEM strike in either the fail-
safe or fail-
secure mode by selecting which holes are used. However, doing so is a tedious
and
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
tricky process, requiring proper alignment of holes, careful removal and
replacement
of one screw, and careful loosening (without removal) of another screw.
There is a need for an electric strike which is more readily switchable
between fail
secure and fail-safe modes, and which preferably offers other advantages over
prior art
strikes.
In view of the preceding, it is an object of the invention to provide an
improved electric
strike, which among other features, provides rapid and easy selection between
fail-safe
and fail-secure modes.
In the invention, a keeper is pivotably arranged in a housing. When prevented
from
pivoting from its home position, the keeper blocks movement of a latch bolt
extending
from a door, so that the door is locked. When the keeper is allowed to pivot,
the latch
bolt can push the keeper aside, so that the door can be opened. To prevent the
keeper
from pivoting, the keeper has at least one abutment, which a blocking surface
or
surfaces of a blocking element either contacts (door locked) or does not
contact (door
unlocked) when the keeper tries to pivot. The blocking element is movable by
an
actuation means, for example a solenoid, between a first (unenergized)
position and a
second (energized) position. The blocking element and blocking element
actuation
means are mounted in a holder, which in turn is slidably mounted in a housing,
for
movement between one of two holder positions, namely a fail-secure position
and a fail-
safe position. In the fail-secure position, the blocking surfaces are opposite
the keeper's
abutments in the unenergized position, and in the fail-safe position the
blocking
surfaces are opposite the keeper's abutments only when the actuator is
energized. A
two-position mode selector, set at the time of installation, establishes which
of the two
holder positions is used, i.e. whether the strike is installed in fail-safe or
fail-secure
mode. In the preferred embodiment, the mode selector is an eccentric,
rotatable
between two positions 180 degrees apart, accessible from outside the housing.
The strike preferably also has a latch bolt monitor arm pivotally mounted in
the housing.
When the latch bolt is in place in the strike, i.e. when the door is closed,
the latch bolt
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
depresses a plate which rotates the latch bolt monitor arm, bringing a cam
into contact
with the switch button of a microswitch, thereby indicating whether the door
is open or
closed.
The strike preferably also has a keeper microswitch arranged in the housing
and
cooperating with an indicator cutout arranged on the keeper to indicate when
the
keeper is either in its home position, or its rotated position, indicating
opening of the
door. The keeper microswitch is actuated when the keeper is in one position,
and not
actuated in the other keeper position, by a surface of the keeper depressing
or not
depressing the switch button of the keeper microswitch.
The strike assembly includes a lip bracket attached to the housing, to allow
on-site
dimensional adjustment. The lip bracket preferably has profiled surfaces
cooperating
with similarly profiled surfaces on the housing, to provide stepwise
adjustment of the
relative position of the lip bracket to the housing together with positive
locking of the lip
bracket to the housing when the lip bracket is secured to the housing. In the
preferred
embodiment, a particular saw-tooth engagement is used, as will be described in
detail
below.
As an anti-intrusion feature in the preferred embodiment, to prevent someone
from
inserting something to attempt to dislodge the blocking element and thereby
open the
door, the keeper is profiled so as to provide little or no clearance between
it and the
housing, and furthermore a lip is provided in the housing to catch anything
inserted and
the keeper is shaped to direct anything inserted to the area of that lip.
Further features of the invention will be described or will become apparent in
the course
of the following detailed description.
In order that the invention may be more clearly understood, the preferred
embodiment
thereof will now be described in detail, as an example, with reference to the
accompanying drawings, in which:
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
Fig. 1 is an exploded perspective rear view of a strike according to the
preferred
embodiment;
Fig. 2 is a partly assembled view corresponding to Fig. 1, where the blocking
element,
solenoid and holder have been assembled;
Fig. 3 is a further assembled view corresponding to Figs. 1 and 2, where the
blocking
element, solenoid, holder and keeper have been assembled into the housing;
Fig. 4 is a view corresponding to Fig. 3, but also showing a lip bracket and a
face plate;
Fig. 5 is a view corresponding to Fig. 4, showing the housing assembly
assembled with
the lip bracket;
Fig. 6 is a view corresponding to Fig. 5, showing the completed assembly;
Fig. 7 is an exploded perspective view similar to Fig. 1, but viewing the
front of the
preferred embodiment;
Fig. 8 is a view corresponding to Fig. 7, further assembled;
Fig. 9 is a view corresponding to Fig. 8, fully assembled;
Fig. 10 is a sectioned top view showing the saw-tooth engagement between the
housing and lip bracket;
Fig. 11 is a view showing the holder, solenoid, blocking element, mode
selector and
mode selector biasing spring;
Fig. 12 is a perspective view corresponding to Fig. 11, from a different
angle;
Fig. 13 is a perspective view of just the holder;
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
Fig. 14 is a perspective view corresponding to Fig. 13, from a different
angle;
Fig. 15 is a perspective view of the blocking element;
Fig. 16 is a perspective view of a fail-secure vs. fail-safe mode selector;
Fig. 17 is an elevation view of the Fig. 16 mode selector;
Fig. 18 is a perspective view of an alterative mode selector;
Fig. 19 is an elevation view of the alterative mode selector;
Fig. 20 is a perspective view of a latch monitor arm;
Fig. 21 is a sectional end view showing the latch monitor arm cam when the
latch
monitor arm is rotated outwardly;
Fig. 22 is a sectional end view showing the latch monitor arm cam when the
latch
monitor arm is depressed, triggering the latch monitor microswitch;
Figs. 23A-23E show a sequence of latch monitor operation as the door is
closed, from
the Fig. 23A position where the latch bolt is approaching the strike, to the
Fig. 23E
position where the latch bolt is fully extended and retained by the keeper;
Fig. 24 is a sectioned front view of the strike, in fail-safe mode, with the
solenoid
unenergized and the blocking element therefore in a position to allow the
keeper to
rotate;
Fig. 25 is a view corresponding to Fig. 24, with the solenoid energized and
the blocking
element therefore in a position to prevent the keeper from rotating;
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
Fig. 26 is a sectioned front view of the strike, in fail-secure mode, with the
solenoid
energized and the blocking element therefore in a position to allow the keeper
to rotate;
Fig. 27 is a view corresponding to Fig. 26, with the solenoid unenergized and
the
blocking element therefore in a position to prevent the keeper from rotating;
Fig. 28 is a sectioned end view, showing various components previously
described and
in particular an anti-intrusion profile;
Fig. 29 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment, illustrating a
push-type
solenoid instead of a pull-type solenoid;
Figs. 30A and 30B are side and rear views respectively, showing an alternative
mode
selector using a two-position lever, shown in fail-safe mode;
Figs. 31 A and 31 B are side and rear views respectively, corresponding to
Figs. 30A and
30B, shown in fail-secure mode;
Figs. 32A and 32B are side and rear views respectively, showing another
alternative
mode selector using a two-position slide or button, shown in fail-safe mode;
and
Figs. 33A and 34B are side and rear views respectively, corresponding to Figs.
32A and
32B, shown in fail-secure mode.
Figs. 1-6 show a progressive build of the strike as seen from the rear; Figs.
7-9 are
similar, but from the front.
In the preferred embodiment of the invention, a keeper 1 is pivotably arranged
in a
housing 2, and is pivotable between a rotated position where the latch bolt 3
of a door
4 can be removed from the strike to open the door, and a home position (best
seen in
Fig. 23A) where the keeper, if prevented from moving, blocks removal of the
latch bolt
and thus keeps the door locked. When the keeper is allowed to pivot, the latch
bolt can
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
push the keeper aside, so that the door can be opened. The keeper pivots on
two
trunnions 6 at opposite ends thereof, which fit into slots 8 in the housing
(see Fig. 7)
and which are trapped there by surfaces 10 on a lip bracket 12 (see Fig. 4).
The keeper
is biased towards its home position by a suitable biasing means such as a
corrosion
s resistant torsion spring 14.
For the door to be locked, i.e. for the keeper to be prevented from pivoting,
the keeper
has at least one and preferably several abutments 16, which blocking surfaces
18 of
a blocking element 20 either oppose (door locked) or do not oppose (door
unlocked)
when the keeper tries to pivot. In the preferred embodiment, there are two
blocking
surfaces 18, but obviously there could be only one, or there could be more
than two,
subject to obvious space constraints. The blocking element is movable by an
actuation
means, for example a solenoid 22, between a first (unenergized) position and a
second
(energized) position. In the preferred embodiment, the solenoid is a "pull"
type solenoid,
although a "push" type can be used instead, as described later below and as
illustrated
in Fig. 29. The solenoid has electric feeding wires (not shown) routed inside
the housing
and to external terminals 26. Preferably but not necessarily, the solenoid is
dual wound
and has four wires, to provide flexibility through an option to connect for
either 12 or 24
volts DC or AC. For illustration purposes, the solenoid is shown without its
typical
insulating cover.
The blocking element 20 and solenoid 22 are mounted in a holder 30. The
solenoid
pulls a plunger 32, against the biasing force of a spring 34, which preferably
is made
of stainless steel for corrosion resistance. The plunger has a disc portion 36
on the
distal end thereof, and a relief area 38 which fits into a slot 40 in a plate
at the end of
the blocking element. This ties the blocking element to the movement of the
plunger,
so that when the solenoid is actuated, the blocking element is pulled towards
the
solenoid, thus moving the blocking surfaces 18 either into or out of
engagement with
the abutments 16 of the keeper, depending on which mode was selected at the
time of
installation. In the fail-secure mode actuation of the solenoid moves the
blocking
surfaces out of engagement (i.e. they normally do block in a power-off mode,
so the
door is locked), whereas in the fail-safe mode actuation of the solenoid moves
the
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CA 02405642 2002-09-27
blocking surfaces into engagement (i.e. they normally do not block in a power-
off mode,
so the door is unlocked).
The blocking element is guided at one end by the solenoid plunger 32, and at
the other
end on the rear side by a tab 42 in a slot 43 under a guide rail 44, and on
the front side
by a projection 46, which extends under a guide 47 on the holder.
The holder 30, in which the blocking element 20 and solenoid 22 are mounted,
in turn
is slidably mounted in the housing 2, for movement between one of two holder
positions, namely a fail-secure position and a fail-safe position. The holder
is held in
place front to back by being trapped between the housing and a rear plate 48,
and has
alignment protrusions 49 which cooperate with alignment slots 50 arranged in
the rear
plate and in the housing. The rear plate is secured to the housing by screws
52 through
holes 53 in the rear plate into holes 54 in the housing.
In the fail-secure position, the blocking surfaces 18 are opposite the
keeper's
abutments 16 in the unenergized position, and in the fail-safe position the
blocking
surfaces are opposite the keeper's abutments only when the actuator is
energized. A
two-position mode selector, for example an eccentric 60, establishes which of
the two
holder positions is used, i.e. whether the strike is installed in fail-safe or
fail-secure
mode. The mode is set by the installer at the time of installation.
In the preferred embodiment, the mode selector 60 is rotatable via a slotted
head 61
between two positions 180 degrees apart, projecting through a hole 68 in the
housing
and therefore accessible from outside the housing. The preferred mode selector
has
an eccentric disc portion 63, and a pin 62 extending centrally therefrom.
Rotating the
head 180 degrees, using a screwdriver or even a small coin, results in the
eccentric
disc portion 63 and pin 62 being in one of two spaced-apart positions. Since
the disc
portion 63 fits into a slot 64 in the back of the holder 30, its displacement
by rotation of
the selector results in the holder sliding in the housing from one position to
another, i.e.
from a fail-secure position, to a fail-safe position. The pin 62 fits into a
slot 65 in the
holder 30, and serves to keep the mode selector in whichever position is
selected, by
_g_

CA 02405642 2002-09-27
virtue of the spring 7Z acting on the pin to keep it biased towards the
appropriate end
of the slot 65. Preferably the dimensions are arranged so that any load from
the holder
is borne by the disc portion 63 rather than by the pin 62.
The preferred embodiment of the mode selector requires installation from
inside the
housing. In an alternative embodiment, shown in Figs. 18 and 19, the mode
selector 60'
has a pin 62 offset from the head, and a cylindrical portion 69. This selector
can be
inserted through the hole 68 from outside the housing, but requires internal
installation
of a clip (not shown) in a groove 70 in the cylindrical portion, to prevent it
from
subsequently falling out. In this alternative embodiment, the pin 62 itself
takes any load
from the holder.
The two-position mode selector is a key feature of the invention, in that it
provides a
very simple means for the installer to switch between modes, simply by
rotating the
selector.
Once the selector is in the desired position, it of course is highly desirable
that it should
remain there. Accordingly, in the preferred embodiment, a biasing means is
provided
so that the selector is biased to remain in whichever one of its two positions
is selected.
In the preferred embodiment, that biasing means is a spring 72 which is
arranged to
push the pin towards either end position (in this case by pushing at roughly
90 degrees
to a diameter line drawn between the two end points), as seen best in Figs. 11
and 12.
(In Fig. 12, the spring is shown in the position it would be in if the pin 62
was present,
though without the pin it in fact would be sprung across the slot, since it
pushes the pin
away from the position the spring is shown in.) The spring 72 is a torsion
spring in the
preferred embodiment, mounted on a post 74, but clearly it could be any other
suitable
arrangement, including for example a leaf spring positioned to act in the same
direction.
Referring now to Figs. 7, 8 and 20-22, the housing further has a groove 80 in
its front
face for pivotably holding a latch monitor arm 82. The latch monitor arm is
generally
elongate, having a first end with an extension 83 having a door latch bolt
plate 84 at its
distal end. At the opposite end of the arm is a microswitch cam 85. When a
door latch
_g_

CA 02405642 2002-09-27
bolt is present in the strike, it will press the plate inwardly, and hence
rotate the latch
monitor arm, so that the microswitch cam then triggers a microswitch 86, as
seen in
Figs. 21 and 22 in particular. A cover 8T protects the microswitch. The latch
monitor
arm 82 is biased outwardly by a latch arm biasing means, for example a torsion
spring
88 (see Fig. 7).
Figs. 23A-23E show a sequence of latch monitor operation as the door 4 is
closed, from
the Fig. 23A position where the latch bolt 3 is approaching the strike, to the
Fig. 23E
position where the latch bolt is fully extended and retained by the keeper. In
Fig. 23A,
the door latch bolt is still outside the strike and the keeper, and the latch
bolt plate 84
is in its raised position. In Fig. 23B, the door latch bolt has contacted the
keeper and
has begun to retract into the door. Fig. 23C shows full retraction of the door
latch bolt
into the door, and Fig. 23D shows the door latch bolt just past the keeper and
starting
to extend again, contacting the latch bolt plate. In Fig. 23E, the door latch
bolt has
pressed the latch bolt plate to its depressed position, causing the cam 85 to
activate the
microswitch 86, thus allowing remote monitoring of the door status. Some of
the details
in these drawings do not correspond to the preferred embodiment, being from an
earlier
prototype, but the principle is the same.
A face plate 90 is secured to the lip bracket 12 by screws (not shown) through
holes 93
in the face plate and into holes 94 in the lip bracket, and is used to secure
the strike to
the door jamb, using screws through mounting holes 95. Face plate
configuration can
be varied as desired, to suit various new or existing door jamb
configurations. The tip
bracket preferably has profiled surfaces 96, cooperating with similarly
profiled surfaces
97 on the housing, to provide stepwise adjustment coupled with positive
locking of the
lip bracket to the housing. The lip bracket is secured to the housing at the
desired depth
setting by screws (not shown) through slots 110 in the lip bracket into holes
111 in the
housing. The profiles preferably are as shown in Fig. 10, i.e. complementary
saw-tooth
surfaces, with the mating surfaces being perpendicular or nearly so in the
direction to
oppose outward displacement of the housing (as indicated by the arrow)
relative to the
lip bracket (i.e. in the direction of pull for opening the door). The lip
bracket may have
-10-

CA 02405642 2002-09-27
several size variations to accommodate either 112 inch or 5/8 inch keepers (or
of course
any other size which might be adopted).
To positively detect the keeper position in the strike, the keeper 1
advantageously has
an indicator cutout 98 arranged to cooperate with a keeper microswitch 99, so
that the
keeper microswitch is actuated when the keeper is fully retracted, and off at
any other
position of the keeper. The cutout results in the microswitch not being
activated when
the keeper is in its home position, but rotation of the keeper brings the ramp
out of the
cutout into contact with the microswitch, to trigger it. This provides an
indication of door
opening, for statistical or other purposes.
Figs. 24 and 25 show the strike in its fail-safe mode, i.e. the keeper being
unblocked
when the solenoid is unenergized. Fig. 24 shows the solenoid unenergized, and
Fig, 25
shows it energized. It can be seen that in the former position the blocking
surfaces 18
are not aligned with the keeper abutments 16 (door free), whereas in the
latter position
they are (door locked).
Figs. 26 and 27 are similar, but showing the fail-secure mode, with the
solenoid
energized in Fig. 26 and the door unlocked, and the solenoid unenergized and
the door
locked in Fig. 27.
Referring now to Fig. 28, as an anti-intrusion feature in the preferred
embodiment, to
prevent someone from inserting something thin and flexible to attempt to
dislodge the
blocking element and thereby open the door, the keeper is profiled so as to
provide little
or no clearance between it and the housing, and furthermore a catch 100 is
provided
in the housing to block anything inserted and the keeper has a lip 102 shaped
to direct
anything inserted to the area of that catch.
It will be appreciated that the above description relates to the preferred
embodiment by
way of example only. Many variations on the invention will be obvious to those
knowledgeable in the field, and such obvious variations are within the scope
of the
invention as described and claimed, whether or not expressly described.
-11-

CA 02405642 2002-09-27
For example, in addition to possible variations specifically mentioned above,
Fig. 29
shows a push-type solenoid 22' instead of the pull-type of the preferred
embodiment..
The blocking element is guided by a blocking element guide pin 106, and a
spring 108
on the guide pin biases the blocking element towards the solenoid.
It should also be appreciated that the two-position mode selector could be
configured
differently, although the eccentric arrangement is preferred. For example,
there could
be a small pivotable two-position fever with a pin projecting from it, with
the same two
end positions as in the preferred embodiment, and a spring arrangement to bias
the
lever to either of the two positions. Or, there could be a small sliding bar
with a pin
projecting from it, again with the same two end positions and spring biasing.
Or, instead
of spring biasing into the end positions, there could be notches or ball-
spring detents
or the like which the movable selector elements would engage. Some further
such
examples are illustrated in Figs. 30A-33B, the key being that each mechanism
results
in the pin 62 moving from one end position to another, thus moving the holder
30 from
one mode position to another, the pin or mode selector preferably being biased
by any
suitable means to then stay in the selected position. In Figs. 30A-31 B, the
mode
selector 60' is a small lever, pivotable between two positions, with a pin 62
extending
into the housing and engaging the holder 30 as in the preferred embodiment. In
Figs.
32A-33B, the mode selector 60" is a small button, slidable between two
positions, again
with a pin 62 engaging the holder 30.
Some additional features or advantages are as follows:
a. The strike lends itself equally well to left or right hand jamb
installation.
b. Since the pivotal keeper is trunnion mounted, a separate hinge shaft is not
required.
c. The keeper position is laterally adjustable for physical installation
variables,
using the lateral adjustment possibility of the housing relative to the lip
bracket.
-12-

CA 02405642 2002-09-27
d. The strike has a compact design. The total thickness is typically 1-3/16"
for a
5/8" keeper (3/4" maximum latch projection), and 1-1/16" for a 1/2" keeper
(5/8"
maximum latch projection).
The choice of materials is not part of the invention per se. However, the
keeper is
preferably ferrous metal injection molded, investment cast or bar extruded,
and
provided with a suitable coating to provide a corrosion-resistant keeper. The
holder is
advantageously metal injection molded or investment cast and suitably surface
treated
for corrosion resistance. The housing is preferably investment cast or die
cast and/or
powder metal formed, and suitably plated to provide a corrosion-resistant
housing. The
blocking element is preferably made of stainless steel to provide a non-
magnetic
material, and is advantageously surface treated, e.g. plated, for minimum co-
efficient
of friction. The latch monitor arm is advantageously die cast or investment
cast. The lip
bracket is preferably die cast and/or investment cast. Advantageously, an
aesthetically
pleasing surface finish is provided. The face plate is constructed of
stainless steel or
other materials of sufficient strength to achieve an aesthetically pleasing
surface
finishing which can withstand the required abuse during use.
The strike is suitable for buildings requiring egress/ingress control such as
commercial
buildings, hospitals, warehouses, and educational facilities, as non-limiting
examples.
The latch and keeper monitor means are used for traffic intelligence, when the
strike
is connected to a building security system, for instance.
-13-

Representative Drawing

Sorry, the representative drawing for patent document number 2405642 was not found.

Administrative Status

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Administrative Status

Title Date
Forecasted Issue Date 2009-04-28
(22) Filed 2002-09-27
(41) Open to Public Inspection 2004-03-27
Examination Requested 2007-09-17
(45) Issued 2009-04-28
Expired 2022-09-27

Abandonment History

There is no abandonment history.

Payment History

Fee Type Anniversary Year Due Date Amount Paid Paid Date
Registration of a document - section 124 $100.00 2002-09-27
Application Fee $300.00 2002-09-27
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 2 2004-09-27 $100.00 2004-09-22
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 3 2005-09-27 $100.00 2005-09-26
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 4 2006-09-27 $100.00 2006-08-18
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 5 2007-09-27 $200.00 2007-08-15
Request for Examination $800.00 2007-09-17
Advance an application for a patent out of its routine order $500.00 2008-06-03
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 6 2008-09-29 $200.00 2008-07-31
Final Fee $300.00 2009-02-09
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 7 2009-09-28 $200.00 2009-08-18
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 8 2010-09-27 $200.00 2010-08-30
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 9 2011-09-27 $200.00 2011-08-30
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 10 2012-09-27 $250.00 2012-08-30
Registration of a document - section 124 $100.00 2012-11-13
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 11 2013-09-27 $250.00 2013-09-17
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 12 2014-09-29 $250.00 2014-09-22
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 13 2015-09-28 $250.00 2015-09-28
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 14 2016-09-27 $250.00 2016-09-26
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 15 2017-09-27 $450.00 2017-09-21
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 16 2018-09-27 $450.00 2018-09-07
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 17 2019-09-27 $450.00 2019-09-16
Registration of a document - section 124 2019-12-13 $100.00 2019-12-13
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 18 2020-09-28 $450.00 2020-09-14
Maintenance Fee - Patent - New Act 19 2021-09-27 $459.00 2021-09-13
Owners on Record

Note: Records showing the ownership history in alphabetical order.

Current Owners on Record
DORMAKABA CANADA INC.
Past Owners on Record
BASHFORD, ANTHONY J.
RUTHERFORD CONTROLS INT'L INC.
RUTHERFORD CONTROLS INT'L. CORP.
Past Owners that do not appear in the "Owners on Record" listing will appear in other documentation within the application.
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Document
Description 
Date
(yyyy-mm-dd) 
Number of pages   Size of Image (KB) 
Abstract 2002-09-27 1 40
Description 2002-09-27 13 625
Claims 2002-09-27 3 101
Cover Page 2004-03-02 1 42
Claims 2008-06-03 3 126
Cover Page 2009-04-09 1 42
Assignment 2002-09-27 5 136
Maintenance Fee Payment 2017-09-21 1 28
Prosecution-Amendment 2007-09-17 1 29
Prosecution-Amendment 2008-06-03 1 44
Prosecution-Amendment 2008-06-03 3 79
Prosecution-Amendment 2008-07-02 1 12
Correspondence 2009-02-09 1 39
Maintenance Fee Payment 2018-09-07 1 25
Drawings 2002-09-27 18 524
Assignment 2012-11-13 6 143