Canadian Patents Database / Patent 2499018 Summary

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(12) Patent Application: (11) CA 2499018
(54) English Title: OCEAN WAVE HYDRAULIC AIR COMPRESSOR
(54) French Title: COMPRESSEUR D'AIR HYDRAULIQUE A VAGUES OCEANIQUES
(51) International Patent Classification (IPC):
  • F03B 13/22 (2006.01)
  • F04B 9/10 (2006.01)
  • F04B 35/02 (2006.01)
(72) Inventors :
  • ABOU-RAPHAEL, AFIF (Canada)
(73) Owners :
  • ABOU-RAPHAEL, AFIF (Canada)
(71) Applicants :
  • ABOU-RAPHAEL, AFIF (Canada)
(74) Agent: NA
(74) Associate agent: NA
(45) Issued:
(22) Filed Date: 2005-03-10
(41) Open to Public Inspection: 2006-09-10
(30) Availability of licence: N/A
(30) Language of filing: English

English Abstract





The subject of this invention is an ocean wave air compressor that produces
variable flows, by using
the perpetual, clean, abundant and renewable energy of the sea waves. This
compressor uses the
force of the waves and the hydrostatic pressure of water in order to admit and
compress air in an
adjustable compression chamber where any waves' height is useful. The said
compressor can be
mounted in addition on pylons in the middle of seawater, where levelling means
are used to lower or
higher it during high and low tides. Air is compressed when the wave hits the
compressor and water
is admitted inside the compression chamber, and atmospheric air is admitted
for the next cycle when
the water recedes out of the compressor. The resulting compressed air is
collected in a pressure tank
to be used later to run a power plant such as that described in CA patent no
2328580.


Note: Claims are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.



CLAIMS
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege
is claimed are
defined as follows:
1- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor for compressing air by utilising the
perpetual, clean,
abundant and renewable energy of the sea waves, characterised by:
A container turned upside down, where its bottom opening is connected to a
wide open mouth, that
faces the open sea in order to contain completely any size of sea waves, while
permitting them to hit
hard, that allows seawater to flow inside said container propelled by inertia
and hydrostatic pressure
in order to compress and push out of the said ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor any imprisoned
volume of air inside said container that is called the compression chamber.
Said compressor's wide
open mouth is used in addition for seawater outlet during atmospheric air
admission when the wave
recedes and the seawater retreats out of said compression chamber of said
ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor.
2- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 1, characterised
by:
A variable compression chamber that allows said Ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor to produce
variable flows according to the height of sea waves during high or low seas.
3- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 1 and 2,
characterised by:
Said container that is made out of two telescopic parts, an upper first part
that is mobile and a lower
second part that is stationary. The upper end of the mobile first upper part
is closed and houses the
atmospheric air inlet and compressed air outlet valves, while its bottom is
open enough to let said
mobile first upper part to overlap and slide over said stationary second lower
part, that permits the
creation of a variable volume for said compression chamber of said ocean wave
hydraulic air
compressor in order to admit and compress a right volume of air according with
any sea waves'
height and energy.
16



4- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 3, characterised
by:
A seal that is located between said mobile first upper and said stationary
second lower parts of said
ocean wave hydraulic air compressor in order to create a tight joint between
them, that prevents any
air leak at this point during the air compression cycles.
5- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claims 1 to 4,
characterised by:
Levelling means to higher or lower said mobile first upper part of said ocean
wave hydraulic air
compressor in order to variate the inside volume of said compression chamber
that determines the
admitted volume of atmospheric air.
6- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 1, characterised
by:
Float means that prevent seawater from going beyond said air outlet valves at
the end of any
compression and exhaust cycles of compressed air.
7- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 1, characterised
by:
seawater collection means that hold any seawater crossing beyond said
compressed air outlet valves,
that help to collect and purge any seawater accumulation from the compressed
air's system,
8- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 1, characterised
by:
Shock absorber means that can be fixed on said compressor's mobile first upper
part's levelling
means, in order to absorb the violent hits of the sea waves on the upper end
of said compression
chamber at the end of the compressed air cycles,
17



9- Ocean wave hydraulic air compressor as claimed in claim 1, characterised
by:
Levelling means for the entire compressor, combined with long pylons that are
affixed on the sea
bed in order to hold said entire ocean wave hydraulic air compressor fare from
shore at a right level
according to high and low tides for a better harness of said perpetual, clean,
abundant and renewable
energy of said sea waves.
18

Note: Descriptions are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
Ocean Wave Hydraulic Air Compressor.
This invention relates to the con struction of an ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor that uses the
perpetual, clean, abundant and renewable energy of sea waves.
The subject of this invention is a hydraulic-like compressor; that uses the
perpetual, clean, abundant
and renewable energy of sea waves in order to admit and compress variable
volumes of air. This
compressor uses a compression chamber that replaces the cylinder, and the
seawater that replaces
the piston of conventional compressors. In addition the present ocean wave
hydraulic air compressor
eliminates specially the use of non-renewable energy while ensuring ease of
operation, efficiency
and the conservation of energy.
The embodiment of this invention includes the following:
1- A container turned upside dov~rn, where its bottom-opening is connected to
a wide open mouth,
that faces the open sea in order to contain completely any size of sea waves,
while permitting them
to hit hard, that allows seawater to flow inside the container propelled by
inertia and hydrostatic
pressure in order to compress and push out of the said compressor any
imprisoned volume of air
inside the said container that is called the compression chamber. The said
mouth is made in a way to
let the waves hit and be direct to 'the inside of the compressor, and it is
used in addition of seawater
inlet during the air compression cycle, for the seawater outlet during
atmospheric air admission
when the wave recedes and the sf;awater retreats out of the compression
chamber of the said ocean
wave hydraulic air compressor.
2- Air inlet and outlet valves that are located at the higher end of the
container, allow only
atmospheric air to enter during the air admission cycle through the inlet
valves while the outlet
valves are blocked, and compressed air to exhaust during the compressed air
exhaust cycle through
the outlet valves while the inlet valves are blocked.
3- A variable compression chamber allowing the compressor to produce variable
flows according to
the height of the sea waves during high or low seas. The said container is
made out of two telescopic
parts, an upper first part that is mobile and a lower second part that is
stationary. The upper end of

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
the mobile first upper part is closed and houses the air inlet and outlet
valves, while its bottom is
open enough to let it overlap and slide over the stationary second lower part
that permits the creation
of a variable volume inside the compressor in order to admit and compress a
right volume of air
according with the waves height and energy.
4- A seal that is located between the mobile first upper and the stationary
second lower parts of the
compressor in order to create a tight joint between them, which prevents any
air leak at this point
during the air compression cycles..
5- Levelling means such as hydraulic cylinders or the like, to higher or lower
the mobile first upper
part of the compressor in order to variate the inside volume of the
compression chamber that
determines the admitted volume of atmospheric air.
6- Float means that prevent seawater from going beyond the air outlet valves
at the end of the
compression and the exhaust cycle of compressed air. These float means are
optional.
7- Seawater collection means that hold any seawater crossing beyond the
compressed air outlet
valves, that help to collect and purge any seawater accumulation from the
compressed air's system.
8- Shock absorber means that can be fixed on the compressor's mobile first
upper part levelling
means, in order to absorb the violent hits of the sea waves on the upper end
of the compression
chamber at the end of the compressed air cycles.
9- Other levelling means for the entire compressor, combined with long pylons
that are affixed on
the sea-bed in order to hold the entire compressor fare from shore at the
right level according to high
and low tides for a better harness of the perpetual, clean, abundant and
renewable energy of the sea
waves.
The compressed air produced by this type of ocean wave hydraulic air
compressors will be used to
run power plants of the sort of the Canadian patent no 2460452.
2

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
Depending on site specifications and the output required, various components,
configurations and
dimensions for the embodiment may be combined to achieve the desired results.
For a better
understanding of this invention and to facilitate its examination, it is
represented in the following 21
Figures.
3

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
Brief description of the drawings:
1- Figure 1 is a left view of the ocean wave hydraulic air compressor.
2- Figure 2 is a front view of figure 1.
3- Figure 3 is a top view of figure 1.
4- Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view along line A-A of figure 3.
5- Figure 5 is a cross sectional view along line A-A of figure 3, showing the
end of an atmospheric
air admission cycle and the lowest level the seawater can rich during a storm.
6- Figure 6 is a cross sectional view along line A-A of figure 3, showing the
end of an air
compression cycle and the highest level the seawater can rich during a storm.
7- Figure 7 is a cross-sectional view along line B-B of figure 6.
8- Figure 8 is a left view of the ocean wave hydraulic air compressor during
an almost calm sea.
9- Figure 9 is a front view of figure 8.
10- Figure 10 is a top view of figure 8.
11- Figure 11 is a cross sectional view along line G-G of figure 10.
12- Figure 12 is a cross sectional view along line G-G of figure 10, showing
the end of an
atmospheric air admission cycle, and the lowest level the seawater can rich
during an almost calm
sea, with optional water collection means that collect the seawater in case
some seawater crosses the
exhaust outlet valves, with optional float means that prevent seawater from
crossing the exhaust
outlet valves and going into the air compression exhaust line, and with
optional shock absorber
means that protect the ocean wave hydraulic air compressor if the water hits
hard the inside higher
4

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
wall of the air compression chamber.
13- Figure 13 is a cross sectional view along line G-G of figure 10, showing
the end of an air
compression cycle and the highest level the seawater can rich during an almost
calm sea, with the
said optional water collection means, the said optional float means, and the
said optional shock
absorber means.
14- Figure 14 is a cross-sectional view along line C-C of figure 13.
15- Figure 15 is an enlarged schematic cross-sectional view of an optional
shock-absorber means.
16- Figure 16 is a schematic left view of an ocean waves hydraulic air
compressor, built on pylons
that are affixed to the sea-bed fan from shore with levelling-means that lower
the entire compressor
during low tide and higher it during high tide.
17- Figure 17 is a front view of figure 16.
18- Figure 18 is a top view of figure 16.
19- Figure 19 is a cross sectional view along line D-D of figure 18.
20- Figure 20 is a schematic representation of a power plant of the Canadian
patent no 2460452
working with compressed air produced by an ocean wave hydraulic air compressor
during an almost
calm sea.
21- Figure 21 is a schematic representation of a power plant of the Canadian
patent no 2460452
working with compressed air produced by an ocean wave hydraulic air compressor
during high sea.

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
Detailed description of the invention.
When considered with the description herein, the characteristics of the
invention are apparent from
the accompanying drawings, which exemplify an embodiment of the invention for
purposes of
illustration only, and in which -
1- Figure 1 is a left view of an ocean wave hydraulic air compressor including
the mobile first upper
part 2, the stationary second lowc,~r part 3, the large mouth 1, the levelling-
means of the mobile first
upper part 2 including in this design, hydraulic cylinders 4, pistons 5,
brackets 6 that are affixed to
the mobile first upper part 2, brackets 7 that are affixed to the stationary
second lower part 3. Figure
1 includes in addition the air admission line 8 and the compressed air
transmission line 9.
2- Figure 2 is a front view of figure 1 including the mobile first upper-part
2, the large mouth 1 with
its higher end 13, its lower end 12:, and its right and left ends 11.
3- Figure 3 is a top view of figure 1 including the mobile first upper-part 2,
the air inlet valves 14
and the air outlet valves 15, the large mouth 1 with its higher end 13. Figure
3 includes in addition
the brackets 6 and 7, and the hydraulic compressors 4 of the levelling-means
of the mobile first
upper-part 2.
4- Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view along line A-A of figure 3 including the
mobile first upper-part
2, the stationary second lower part 3, the bottom-end 3-A of the stationary
second lower part 3
where atmospheric air enters to the compression chamber at the end of the
atmospheric air
admission cycle, the large mouth 1, the seal 17 that is located between the
mobile first upper-part 2
and the stationary second lower part 3 of the compressor in order to create a
tight joint between
them that prevents any air leak at this point during the air compression
cycles, the levelling-means
of the mobile first upper-part 2 including in this design, the hydraulic
cylinders 4, the pistons S, the
brackets 6 that are affixed to the mobile first upper-part 2, the brackets 7
that are affixed to the
stationary second lower-part 3. Figure 3 includes in addition, the air inlet
valve 14, the compressed
air outlet valve 15, the admission line 8 and the compressed air transmission
line 9, the upper end 13
and the lower end 12 of the large mouth 1.
6

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
5- Figure S is a cross sectional view along line A-A of figure 3, showing the
end of an atmospheric
air admission cycle and the lowest level the sea water can rich during a
storm, it includes the mobile
first upper-part 2, the stationary second lower part 3, the bottom-end 3-A of
the stationary second
lower part 3 where atmospheric a.ir enters to the compression chamber at the
end of the atmospheric
air admission cycles, the large mouth 1, the seal 17, the levelling-means of
the mobile first upper-
part 2 including in this design, than hydraulic cylinders 4, the pistons 5,
the brackets 6 that are affixed
to the mobile first upper part 2, tile brackets 7 that are affixed to the
stationary second lower part 3.
Figure 3 includes in addition the air inlet valve 14 that is open, the
compressed air outlet valve 15
that is closed, the admission line 8 and the compressed air transmission line
9, the upper end 13 and
the lower end 12 of the large mouth 1, and the seawater that is at the lowest
level during the end of
atmospheric air admission cycle.
6- Figure 6 is a cross sectional view along line A-A of figure 3, showing the
end of an air
compression cycle and the highest level the sea water can rich during a storm,
it includes the mobile
first upper-part 2, the stationary second lower part 3, the large mouth 1, the
seal 17, the levelling-
means of the mobile first upper-part 2 including in this design, the hydraulic
cylinders 4, the pistons
5, the brackets 6 that are affixed to the mobile first upper-part 2, the
brackets 7 that are affixed to the
stationary second lower part 3. Figure 3 includes in addition the air inlet
valve 14 that is closed, the
compressed air outlet valve 1 S that is open, the admission line 8 and the
compressed air transmission
line 9, the upper end 13 and the lower end 12 of the large mouth 1, and the
seawater that is at the
highest level during compressed a.ir cycles.
7- Figure 7 is a cross-sectional view along line B-B of figure 6 including the
mobile first upper-part
2, the stationary second lower part 3, the seal 17, the large mouth 1 with its
higher end 13, its lower
end 12, and its left and right ends 11. Figure 3 includes in addition the
brackets 7, and the hydraulic
compressors 4 of the levelling-means of the mobile first upper-part 2.
8- Figure 8 is a left view of the ocean wave hydraulic air compressor during
an almost calm sea
including the mobile first upper-part 2, the stationary second lower part 3,
the large mouth 1, the
levelling-means of the mobile first upper-part 2 including in this design,
hydraulic cylinders 4,
pistons 5, brackets 6 that are affixed to the mobile first upper-part 2,
brackets 7 that are affixed to
the stationary second lower part 3. Figure 1 includes in addition the air
admission line 8 and the
7

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
compressed air transmission line ~9.
9- Figure 9 is a front view of figure 8 including the mobile first upper-part
2, the bottom end 3-A of
the stationary second lower part 3 where atmospheric air enters to the
compression chamber at the
end of the atmospheric air admission cycles, the large mouth 1 with its higher
end 13, its lower end
12, and its right and left ends 11.
10- Figure 10 is a top view of figure 8 including the mobile first upper-part
2, the air inlet valves 14
and the air outlet valves 15, and the large mouth 1 with its higher end 13.
Figure 3 includes in
addition the brackets 6 and 7, and. the hydraulic cylinders 4 of the levelling-
means of the mobile first
upper-part 2.
11- Figure 11 is a cross sectional view along line G-G of figure 10 including
the mobile first upper-
part 2, the stationary second lower part 3, the bottom end 3-A of the lower
part 3 where atmospheric
air enters to the compression chamber at the end of the atmospheric air
admission cycles, the large
mouth l, the seal 17 that are located between the mobile first upper-part 2
and the stationary second
lower part 3 of the compressor in order to create a tight joint between them
that prevents any air leak
at this point during the air compression cycles, the levelling-means of the
mobile first upper-part 2
including in this design, the hydraulic cylinders 4, the pistons 5, the
brackets 6 that are affixed to the
mobile first upper-part 2, the brackets 7 that are affixed to the stationary
second lower part 3. Figure
3 includes in addition the air inlet valve 14, the compressed air outlet valve
15, the admission line 8
and the compressed air transmission line 9, the upper end 13 and the lower end
12 of the large
mouth 1.
12- Figure 12 is a cross sectional view along line G-G of figure 10, showing
the end of an
atmospheric air admission cycle, and the lowest level the seawater can rich
during an almost calm
sea, with an optional seawater collection means including a tank 25 and a
purge valve 26 that collect
and purge seawater 27 in case some of it crosses accidentally the exhaust
outlet valves 15, with
optional float means including a float 21, a float-housing 22, drillings 24
that permit seawater to
enter the float housing 22, the float's upper surface 23 that fits snugly with
the opening 2-A to
prevent seawater from crossing the exhaust outlet valve 15 and going into the
air compressed
8

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
transmission line 9 at the end of the compressed air exhaust cycle where
seawater is not permitted to
go beyond this limit, and with optional shock absorber means 20 that protect
the ocean wave
hydraulic air compressor from being damaged if the seawater hits hard the
inside higher wall of the
air compression chamber at the end of the compression and exhaust cycles.
Figure 12 includes in
addition the mobile first upper-part 2, the stationary second lower part 3,
the bottom end 3-A of the
stationary second lower part 3 where atmospheric air enters to the compression
chamber at the end
of the atmospheric air admission cycles, the seal 17, the large mouth 1, the
levelling-means of the
mobile first upper-part 2 including in this design, the hydraulic cylinders 4,
the pistons 5, the
brackets 6 that are affixed to the mobile first upper part 2, the brackets 7
that are affixed to the
stationary second lower part 3, the air inlet valve 14 that is open, the
compressed air outlet valve 1 S
that is closed, the admission line 8 and the compressed air transmission line
9, the upper end 13 and
the lower end 12 of the large mouth 1, and the seawater that is at the lowest
level during
atmospheric air admission cycles
13- Figure 13 is a cross sectional view along line G-G of figure 10, showing
the end of an air
compression cycle, and the highest level the seawater can rich during an
almost calm sea with
optional seawater collection means including a tank 25 and a purge valve 26
that collect and purge
seawater 27 in case some of it crosses accidentally the exhaust outlet valves
15, with optional float
means including a float 21 and a float-housing 22 that prevent water from
crossing the exhaust
outlet valve 15 and going into the air compression exhaust line 9 at the end
of air exhaust cycles,
and with optional shock absorber means 20 that protect the ocean wave
hydraulic air compressor
from being damaged if the seawater hits hard the inside higher wall of the air
compression chamber
at the end of the compression and exhaust cycles. Figure 12 includes in
addition the mobile first
upper-part 2, the stationary second lower part 3, the seal 17, the large mouth
1, the levelling-means
of the mobile first upper-part 2 including in this design, the hydraulic
cylinders 4, the pistons 5, the
brackets 6 that are affixed to the mobile first upper-part 2, the brackets 7
that are affixed to the
stationary second lower part 3, tree air inlet valve 14 that is closed, the
compressed air outlet valve
1 S that is open, the admission lire 8 and the compressed air transmission
line 9, the upper end 13
and the lower end 12 of the large mouth 1, and the seawater that is at the
highest level during
atmospheric air compression cycle
14- Figure 14 is a cross-sectional view along line C-C of figure 13 including
the mobile first upper-
9

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
part 2, the stationary second lowc;r part 3, the seal 17, and the large mouth
1 with its higher end 13,
its lower end 12, and its left and right ends 11. Figure 3 includes in
addition the brackets 7 and the
hydraulic cylinders 4 of the levelling-means of the mobile first upper-part 2,
and the float housing
22.
15- Figure 15 is an enlarged schematic cross-sectional view of the optional
shock absorber means
including a spring 29 a spring housing 20, the piston 5 and the piston's
extension 5-A as an
example.
16- Figure 16 is a schematic left view of an ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor built on pylons 31
that are affixed to the sea bed 40, far from shore with levelling-means that
lower the entire
compressor during low tide and higher it during high tide in order to harness
the maximum amount
of renewable, abundant and clean energy of the sea waves. Figure 16 includes
the vertical pylons 31
that are affixed to the sea bed 4(I, the hydraulic compressor 33 that are
mounted on the pylons 31
through the levelling means that include in this case as an example the
hydraulic cylinders 33, the
beams 32, the brackets 36 that affix the hydraulic cylinders 33 to the beams
32, the brackets 37 that
are affixed from one end to the; pistons 34 of the cylinders 33 and from the
other end to the
compressor it self, the bars 38 th;~t slide along the pylons 31 in the grooved
channels 39 that guide
the entire compressor during its levelling by low or high tides while keeping
the said compressor
solid in front of the impact of the sea waves.
17- Figure 17 is a front view of figure 16 including the pylons 31 that are
affixed to the sea bed 40,
the beams 32 and the brackets 38 of the compressor's levelling device, the
compressor's mobile first
upper-part 2, the bottom end 3-A of the stationary second lower part 3, where
atmospheric air enters
to the compression chamber at the end of the atmospheric air admission cycles,
the large mouth 1
with its upper end 13, its lower en.d 12 and its right and left ends 11
18- Figure 18 is a top view of figure 16 including the pylons 31, the beams 32
with the brackets 37
and 38 of the compressor's levelling device, the mobile first upper part 2,
the mouth 1 with its upper
end 13, the hydraulic pistons 4 and the brackets 7 of the mobile first upper's
part 2 levelling device,
the air inlet valves 14 and the compressed air outlet valves 15.

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
19- Figure 19 is a cross sectional view along line D-D of figure 18 including
the pylons 31, the
beams 32 with the brackets 36, 3'l, the hydraulic cylinders 33 and the pistons
34 of the compressor's
levelling device, the mobile first upper part 2 and the stationary second
lower part 3 of the
compressor, the bottom end 3-A of the stationary second lower part 3 where
atmospheric air enters
to the compression chamber at the end of the atmospheric air admission cycles,
the seal 17 that are
located between the upper part 2 and the lower part 3 in order to create a
tight joint between them
that prevents any air leak at this point during the air compression cycles,
the right and left ends 11
and the lower end 12 of the large mouth 1.
20- Figure 20 is a representation of a power plant E of the Canadian patent no
2460452 working
with compressed air produced by an ocean wave hydraulic air compressor during
an almost calm
sea.
21- Figure 21 is a representation of the same power plant E of the Canadian
patent no 2460452
working with compressed air produced by the same ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor during
high sea.
It should be understood, of course, that this compressor can be built from
various materials and in
different dimensions according to the quantity of compressed air required. The
drawings do not
show every step in the construction of the present invention, but they set out
the overall result
clearly.
The said ocean wave hydraulic air compressor can have any number of units. The
following is the
functioning of one unit as detailed in the example of the present invention.
According to the example of the present invention, the ocean wave hydraulic
air compressor is built
offshore and before starting it, all of its components must be in place in
order to produce the needed
flow of compressed air:
1- The size and the flow of the compressor is determined in order to build the
appropriate power
plant of the Canadian patent no 2460452 that can function with the actual
compressed air of the said
ocean wave hydraulic air compressor,
11

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
2- The mobile first upper part 2 i;~ in place overlapping the stationary
second lower part 3 in order to
slide over it to create the needed volume for the compression chamber
according to the sea wave's
height, while the seal 17 is in place and the compressor's large mouth 1 is in
place ready to receive
the waves of high or low seas. In addition the mobile first upper part's 2
levelling device is in place
where the brackets 6 are affixed to the mobile first upper part 2, the
brackets 7 are affixed to the
stationary second lower part 3 and the cylinders 4 with their pistons 5 are in
place and ready to move
upward or downward the said mobile first upper part 2 according to waves'
height.
3- The location of the compressor is chosen in order to determine the length
and the size of the
needed pylons 31 that are affixed to the sea floor 40.
4- The entire compressor is mounted on the said pylons 31 offshore through its
levelling device that
includes the brackets 36 that are affixed to the beams 32 that in turn are
affixed to the pylons 31, the
brackets 37 that are affixed to the compressor it self and in turn are affixed
to the pistons 34 of the
hydraulic cylinders 33, the sliding brackets 38 that are in place in the
guiding grooves 39 of the
pylons 31 that are used to guide the entire compressor during its levelling
procedures while holding
it firmly against the repeated hits and the force of the waves.
5- The line 9 of the compressed air is connected to the rotary transfer joint
18-A of the power plant
E of the Canadian patent no 2460452 in order to transfer the compressed air
from the compressor to
the power plant E.
6- The power plant E is built according to the specifications of the Canadian
patent 2460452 in order
to function with the fluctuated flows that are produced by the ocean wave
hydraulic air compressor
the subject of the present invention.
Operation of the invention.
Once all of the components are irk place, the ocean wave hydraulic air
compressor is ready to run.
1- according to high or low tides, the compressor's levelling device's sensor
determines constantly
the level of the seawater then the order goes to the hydraulic cylinders 33 to
position the
12

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
compressor's mouth 1 at the right level, and the compressor waves height's
sensor determines
constantly the height of the waves, then the order goes to the hydraulic
cylinders 4 to position the
compressor's mobile first upper part 2 that creates the right volume for the
compression chamber in
order to harness the maximum amount of energy that helps to produce the
maximum air flow
according to every situation.
2- figure 5 shows the compressor in place at the surface of the seawater
during high sea, and the
wave's height is previously determined by the compressor's sensor that
commands the hydraulic
cylinders 4 to lift the mobile first upper part 2 of the compressor to create
the right volume that can
be filed exactly with seawater when the wave hits. In addition figure 5 shows
the end of the air inlet
cycle when the wave receded to the lower level the seawater can retreat to.
While retreating, the
seawater is evacuated from the compressor back to the sea through the large
mouth 1, and
atmospheric air is admitted inside the compression chamber through the inlet
air valve 14 in order to
accelerate the evacuation of the seawater, then, when the level of the
seawater riches the bottom end
3-A of the stationary second lower part 3, a communication is established at
this point between the
inside of the compressor and the atmosphere while a bigger quantity of
atmospheric air enters the
compressor in order to fill up completely the compression chamber with the
needed atmospheric air
for the following compression cycle.
3- Figure 6 shows the end of the <;ompressed air cycle during high sea. When
the next wave hits, the
seawater is pushed to enter the compressor through the mouth 1 while
compressing the imprisoned
air and pushing it out of the compressor through the outlet valve 15 and the
line 9 to go to an air
tank or directly to the power plant E figure 21 of the Canadian patent no
2460452.
4- Figure 12 shows the compressor in place at the surface of the seawater
during low sea, and the
wave's height is previously determined by the compressor's sensor that
commands the hydraulic
cylinders 4 to lower the mobile first upper part 2 of the compressor to create
the right volume for the
compression chamber that can be filed exactly with seawater when the wave
hits. In addition figure
12 shows the end of the air inlet cycle when the wave receded to the lower
level the seawater can
retreat to. The same thing happens as for high sea, While retreating, the
seawater is evacuated from
the compressor back to the sea through the large mouth l, and atmospheric air
is admitted inside the
compression chamber through the inlet air valve 14 in order to accelerate the
evacuation of the
13

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
seawater, then, when the level of the seawater riches the bottom end 3-A of
the stationary second
lower part 3, a communication is established exactly as in figure 6 during
high sea, and bigger
quantity of atmospheric air enters the compressor in order to fill up
completely the compression
chamber with the needed atmospheric air for the following compression cycle.
5- Figure 13 shows the end of the compressed air cycle during low sea. When
the next wave hits,
The same thing happens as for high sea, the sea water is pushed to enter the
compressor through the
mouth 1 while compressing the imprisoned air and pushing it out of the
compressor through the
outlet valve 15 and the transmission line 9 to go to an air tank or directly
to the power plant E figure
20 of the Canadian patent no 2461)452.
6- If the compressor is equipped with float means, the float 21 is built in a
way to float at the surface
of the seawater that enters the float housing 22 through the drillings 24 and
its upper surface 23 fits
snugly with the opening 2-A where the compressed air exits through the
compressed air outlet valve
15 at the end of the compressed air exhaust cycle where the seawater is not
permitted to go beyond
this limit.
7- If the compressor is equipped with seawater collection means that hold any
seawater crossing
accidentally beyond the air outlet valves 15 to the air compressed
transmission line 9, the water 27
enters the container 25 while the compressed air continues its way toward the
air tank or toward the
power plant E of the Canadian patent no 2460452. In addition the air system is
equipped with
sensors that help to purge the collected seawater out of the container 25
through the purge valve 26.
8- If the compressor is equipped with Shock absorber means 20 that can be
fixed on the
compressor's mobile first upper I>art's levelling means in order to absorb the
accidental violent hits
of the sea waves on the upper end 2-A of the compression chamber when the
seawater hits hard
accidentally, that means when all of the compressed air of the present cycle
is already pushed out of
the compressor and the seawater still have some inertia. In order to protect
the compressor from
being damage, the hard hit is absorbed by the spring 29 while the mobile first
upper part 2 is pushed
upwardly and the entire compressor stays in place without being affected.
Finally after the hit the
mobile first upper part 2 returns to its original position to be ready for the
next compression cycle.
14

CA 02499018 2005-03-10
In summary, the main advantage of this invention is to produce compressed air
in an effective way
through the use of the renewable;, abundant and clean energy of the sea-waves,
in order to supply
any city or remote areas with the needed electrical power. In addition, units
of the present invention
can be mounted on floating pontoons equipped with levelling devices, that can
be used to produce
compressed air for power plants built in recycled ships as described in the
Canadian patent no
2460452, in order to supply especially areas in time of emergencies.
It should be understood, of course, that the foregoing disclosure relates to
only a preferred
embodiment of the invention, and that it is intended to cover all changes, and
modifications of the
example of the invention herein chosen, for the purposes of the disclosure,
which do not constitute
departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

A single figure which represents the drawing illustrating the invention.

For a clearer understanding of the status of the application/patent presented on this page, the site Disclaimer , as well as the definitions for Patent , Administrative Status , Maintenance Fee  and Payment History  should be consulted.

Admin Status

Title Date
Forecasted Issue Date Unavailable
(22) Filed 2005-03-10
(41) Open to Public Inspection 2006-09-10
Dead Application 2010-03-10

Abandonment History

Abandonment Date Reason Reinstatement Date
2007-03-12 FAILURE TO PAY APPLICATION MAINTENANCE FEE 2007-06-27
2009-03-10 FAILURE TO PAY APPLICATION MAINTENANCE FEE

Payment History

Fee Type Anniversary Year Due Date Amount Paid Paid Date
Filing $200.00 2005-03-10
Reinstatement: Failure to Pay Application Maintenance Fees $200.00 2007-06-27
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 2 2007-03-12 $50.00 2007-06-27
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 3 2008-03-10 $50.00 2007-06-27
Current owners on record shown in alphabetical order.
Current Owners on Record
ABOU-RAPHAEL, AFIF
Past owners on record shown in alphabetical order.
Past Owners on Record
None
Past Owners that do not appear in the "Owners on Record" listing will appear in other documentation within the application.

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Abstract 2005-03-10 1 24
Description 2005-03-10 15 705
Claims 2005-03-10 3 92
Drawings 2005-03-10 21 560
Representative Drawing 2006-01-23 1 19
Cover Page 2006-08-22 2 55
Correspondence 2005-04-06 1 20
Assignment 2005-03-10 1 32
Correspondence 2005-04-18 2 49
Assignment 2005-04-18 2 65
Correspondence 2007-05-10 1 23
Fees 2007-04-10 2 87
Fees 2007-04-10 1 96
Fees 2007-06-27 2 44
Correspondence 2010-02-01 3 155