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Patent 2552130 Summary

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(12) Patent Application: (11) CA 2552130
(54) English Title: METHODS OF DETECTING GASEOUS COMPONENT LEVELS IN A BREATH
(54) French Title: METHODES DE DETECTION DE LA CONCENTRATION DE COMPOSANTS GAZEUX DANS L'HALEINE
Status: Dead
Bibliographic Data
(51) International Patent Classification (IPC):
  • G01N 33/98 (2006.01)
  • A61B 5/087 (2006.01)
  • G01N 27/416 (2006.01)
  • G01N 33/497 (2006.01)
  • G01N 37/00 (2006.01)
  • G01F 1/34 (2006.01)
  • G01F 1/68 (2006.01)
(72) Inventors :
  • GOLLAR, EDWARD (United States of America)
(73) Owners :
  • OMEGAPOINT SYSTEMS, LLC (United States of America)
(71) Applicants :
  • OMEGAPOINT SYSTEMS, LLC (United States of America)
(74) Agent: SIM & MCBURNEY
(74) Associate agent:
(45) Issued:
(22) Filed Date: 2006-07-14
(41) Open to Public Inspection: 2007-01-15
Examination requested: 2011-07-14
Availability of licence: N/A
(25) Language of filing: English

Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT): No

(30) Application Priority Data:
Application No. Country/Territory Date
11/182,402 United States of America 2005-07-15

Abstracts

English Abstract



Method for detecting gaseous component levels in a breath,
comprising: receiving a breath through a breath channel, wherein the breath
channel is in fluid communication with a flow rate sensor and an
electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor; measuring a flow rate of the breath
received through the breath channel; measuring a first time, wherein the first
time corresponds to an amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in
the breath channel; and calculating a current gaseous component level
utilizing the flow rate, first time and an output from the gas sensor. Methods
for detecting an error condition while measuring gaseous component levels in
a breath comprising: determining if the peak output occurs while breath is
still
being received in the breath channel; and if the peak output occurs while
breath is still being received in the breath channel, alerting a user of an
error
condition.


Claims

Note: Claims are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.



We claim:

1. A method for detecting gaseous component levels in a breath,
comprising:
receiving a breath through a breath channel, wherein the breath
channel is in fluid communication with a flow rate sensor and an
electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor;
measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel;
measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an amount
of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the flow rate,
first time and an output from the gas sensor.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the gaseous component is alcohol.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the flow rate sensor comprises a
pressure sensor.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the flow rate sensor comprises a
temperature sensor.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein calculating the current gaseous
component level further comprises calculating a volume of breath received
based on the flow rate and the first time.



15


6. The method of claim 5, further comprising measuring the flow rate at a
plurality of time intervals; and
calculating the volume of breath based on the plurality of flow rates and
time intervals.
7. The method of claim 1, further comprising determining if the output
from the gas sensor is a peak output.
8. The method of claim 7, further comprising:
measuring a second time, wherein the second time corresponds to an
elapsed time from the breath being received in the breath channel and a time
corresponding to the peak output from the gas sensor;
wherein calculating the current gaseous component level further
comprises utilizing the second time.
9. The method of claim 7, further comprising:
determining if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received
in the breath channel; and
if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in the
breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
10. A method for detecting an error condition while measuring gaseous
component levels in a breath, comprising:



16


receiving a breath through a breath channel, wherein the breath
channel is in fluid communication with a flow rate sensor and an
electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor;
measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel;
measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an amount
of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
measuring a peak output form the gas sensor;
determining if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received
in the breath channel; and
if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in the
breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein the gaseous component is alcohol.
12. The method of claim 10, wherein the flow rate sensor comprises a
pressure sensor.
13. The method of claim 10, wherein the flow rate sensor comprises a
temperature sensor.
14. A computer program product comprising a computer readable medium
carrying instructions for allowing a computer system to detect gaseous
component levels in a breath received through a breath channel, the
instructions comprising a method of:



17


measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel;
measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an amount
of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the flow rate,
first time and an output from an electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor in fluid
communication with the breath.
15. The computer program product of claim 14, wherein calculating the
current gaseous component level further comprises calculating a volume of
breath received based on the flow rate and the first time.
16. The method of claim 15, further comprising measuring the flow rate at
a plurality of time intervals; and
calculating the volume of breath based on the plurality of flow rates and
time intervals.
17. The method of claim 14, further comprising determining if the output
from the gas sensor is a peak output.
18. The method of claim 17, further comprising:
measuring a second time, wherein the second time corresponds to an
elapsed time from the breath being received in the breath channel and a time
corresponding to the peak output from the gas sensor;
18



wherein calculating the current gaseous component level further
comprises utilizing the second time.
19. The method of claim 17, further comprising:
determining if the peak output occurs while breath is stiff being received
in the breath channel; and
if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in the
breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
20. A computer program product comprising a computer readable medium
carrying instructions for allowing a computer system to detect an error
condition while measuring gaseous component levels in a breath received
through a breath channel, the instructions comprising a method of:
measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel;
measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an amount
of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
measuring a peak output form the gas sensor;
determining if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received
in the breath channel; and
if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in the
breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
21. A propagated computer data signal transmitted via a propagation
medium, the computer data signal comprising a plurality of instructions for
19



detecting gaseous component levels in a breath received through a breath
channel, wherein the plurality of instructions, when executed by a processor,
cause the processor to perform the act of:
measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel;
measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an amount
of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the flow rate,
first time and an output from an electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor in fluid
communication with the breath.
22. A propagated computer data signal transmitted via a propagation
medium, the computer data signal comprising a plurality of instructions for
detecting gaseous component levels in a breath received through a breath
channel, wherein the plurality of instructions, when executed by a processor,
cause the processor to perform the act of:
measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel;
measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an amount
of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
measuring a peak output form the gas sensor;
determining if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received
in the breath channel; and
if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in the
breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
20



23. A method for detecting gaseous component levels in a breath,
comprising:
receiving a breath through a breath channel, wherein the breath
channel is in fluid communication with an electrochemical fuel cell gas
sensor;
measuring a volume of the breath received through the breath channel;
calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the volume and
an output from the gas sensor.
21

Description

Note: Descriptions are shown in the official language in which they were submitted.



CA 02552130 2006-07-14
Methods of Detecting Gaseous Component Levels in a Breath
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
This application is a continuation-in-part of. U.S. Serial No. 10/097,460,
filed on March 14, 2002, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated
by reference.
TECHNICAL FIELD
The present invention relates to the field of gaseous breath detection
systems, and methods for using the same, and more particularly, to the field
of portable personal gaseous breath detection apparatus and methods for
using same.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
There are several methods for determining the alcohol content (or
level) of a person's breath. A common method is to use a tin-oxide
semiconductor alcohol sensor. It has the advantage of low cost at the
expense of accuracy, alcohol specificity, and electrical power consumption.
Another method is to employ the use of an electrochemical fuel cell alcohol
sensor. While this type of sensor tends to be more accurate, more alcohol
specific, and utilizes less electrical power, the sensor itself is
significantly
more expensive and has traditionally required the use of an active sampling
mechanism, such as a pump, that samples a predetermined volume of breath.
For example, Gammenthaler (U.S. Patent No. 6,026,674) discloses an
apparatus for determining the alcohol concentration in a gaseous mixture.
The apparatus utilizes a fuel cell and a valve. The valve diverts a portion of
the breath flow into the fuel cell thereby indicating and ensuring that a
1


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
predefined amount of breath flow has passed through the fuel cell. The
predetermined volume is calculated by integrating breath flow over time with
the valve open and then closing the valve when the predetermined limit is
reached. An electrochemical sensor responds differently to varying volumes
of an alcohol gas sample. Since the traditional sampling mechanism samples
a predetermined and constant volume of breath, the method for calculating
the alcohol content of the breath does not need to take into account the total
exhaled volume of breath, as does an apparatus without a sampling
mechanism that allows for varying volumes of breath.
Chang et al. (U.S. Patent No. 3,966,579) disclose an apparatus for
measuring alcohol concentrations utilizing an electrochemical fuel cell
alcohol
sensor without an active sampling mechanism. Chang et al. monitor alcohol
concentrations present in a gaseous breath by measuring the magnitude of
the short circuit passing through the external circuit between the anode and
cathode of the fuel cell. However, Chang et al. fail to disclose a method for
detecting and calculating gaseous component levels of the breath which
accounts for volume of the breath received.
In addition, it is desirable to discriminate components different from
ethanol in breath samples. These contaminants can lead to error conditions
such as faulty readings. For example, it is known that cigarette or cigar
smoke can cause fuel cell gas sensors to report inaccurate gas component
levels. Other error conditions could be elevated readings due to other
volatile
components in the breath. Chow (U.S. Patent No. 5,048,321 ) discloses a
method of discriminating alcohols different from ethanol in breath samples.
2


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
Accordingly, it is desirable to have a breath detection method and
apparatus that utilizes an electrochemical fuel cell alcohol ;>ensor for
accuracy, alcohol specificity, and low power consumption, and eliminates the
need for a sampling mechanism, saving more in cost, power consumption,
and size. However, eliminating the sampling mechanism requires an
improved method of calculating the alcohol content of the breath that takes
into account the total exhaled volume of breath. In addition, since an
electrochemical sensor in an apparatus without a sampling mechanism can
respond to gases other than alcohol that are typically found in expired
cigarette, cigar, or pipe smoke and cause an error condition in the fuel cell,
a
method of detecting such an error condition is also desired.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention is directed to methods for detecting gaseous
component levels in a breath. More particularly, the invention is directed to
methods for detecting gaseous component levels in a breath received through
a breath channel utilizing an electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor.
One embodiment of the present invention comprises a method for
detecting gaseous component levels in a breath. The method comprises:
receiving a breath through a breath channel, wherein the breath channehis in
fluid communication with a flow rate sensor and an electrochemical fuel cell
gas sensor; measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the breath
channel; measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to an
amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel; and
calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the flow rate, first
time
and an output from the gas sensor.
3


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
Another embodiment of the present invention is a method for detecting
an error condition while measuring gaseous component levels in a breath_
The method comprises. receiving a breath through a breath channel, wherein
the breath channel is in fluid communication with a flow rate sensor and an
electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor; measuring a flow rate of the breath
received through the breath channel; measuring a first time, wherein the first
time corresponds to an amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in
the breath channel; measuring a peak output from the gas sensor;
determining if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in
the
'i 0 breath channel; and if the peak output occurs while breath is still being
received in the breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
Yet another embodiment of the present invention comprises a
computer program product comprising a computer readable medium carrying
instructions for allowing a computer system to detect gaseous component
'15 levels in a breath received through a breath channel. The instructions
comprising a method of. measuring a flow rate of the breath received through
the breath channel; measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds
to an amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
and calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the flow rate,
first
20 time and an output from an electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor in fluid
communication with the breath.
Another embodiment of the present invention comprises a computer
program product comprising a computer readable medium carrying
instructions for allowing a computer system to detect an error condition while
25 measuring gaseous component levels in a breath received through a breath
4


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
channei_ The instructions comprising a method of: measuring a flow rate of
the breath received through the breath channel; measuring a first time,
wherein the first time corresponds to an amount of time elapsed while
receiving the breath in the breath channel; measuring a peak output from the
gas sensor; determining if the peak output occurs while breath is still being
received in the breath channel; and if the peak output occurs while breath is
still being received in the breath channel, alerting a user of an error
condition_
One embodiment of the present invention comprises a propagated
computer data signal transmitted via a propagation medium. The computer
data signal comprising a plurality of instructions for detecting gaseous
component levels in a breath received through a breath channel. The plurality
of instructions, when executed by a processor, cause the processor to
perform the act of: measuring a flow rate of the breath received through the
breath channel; measuring a first time, wherein the first time corresponds to
an amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel;
and calculating a current gaseous component level utilizing the flow rate,
first
time and an output from an electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor in fluid
communication with the breath.
Yet another embodiment of the present invention comprises a
propagated computer data signal transmitted via a propagation medium. The
computer data signal comprises a plurality of instructions for detecting
gaseous component levels in a breath received through a breath clhannel.
The plurality of instructions, when executed by a processor, cause the
processor to perform the act of: measuring a flow rate of the breath received
through the breath channel; measuring a first time, wherein the first time
5


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
corresponds to an amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the
breath channel; measuring a peak output from the gas sensor; determining if
the peak output occurs white breath is still being received in the breath
channel; and if the peak output occurs while breath is still being received in
the breath channel, alerting a user of an error condition.
Still other advantages of the present invention will become apparent to
those skilled in this art from the following description wherein them is shown
and described exemplary embodiments of this invention, including a best
mode currently contemplated for the invention, simply for purposes of
illustration. As will be realized, the invention is capable of other different
aspects and embodiments without departing from the scope of the invention_
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
While the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out
and distinctly claiming the present invention, it is believed the same will be
better understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the
accompanying drawings in which:
Fig. 1 is a schematic illustration of an exemplary breath alcohol tester
apparatus according to a first embodiment of the present invention;
Fig. 2 is a flowchart depicting an exemplary embodiment of the method
of detecting breath alcohol levels according to a second embodiment of the
present invention;
Fig. 3 is a flowchart depicting an exemplary method of detecting breath
alcohol levels according to a third embodiment of the present invention; and
Fig. 4 is a flowchart depicting an exemplary method of detecting breath
alcohol levels according to a fourth embodiment of the present invention.
6


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
The embodiments set forth in the drawings are illustrative in nature and
are not intended to be limiting of the invention defined by the claims.
Moreover, individual features of the drawings and the invention will be more
fully apparent and understood in view of the detailed description.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
Reference will now be made in detail to the present exemplary
embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the
accompanying drawings, wherein like numerals indicate the same elements
throughout the views.
Referring to Figure 1, the personal breath tester 200 comprises a
breath passage 1 having a flowpath 120, a proximal end 100 and a distal end
102, wherein the proximal end 100 comprises an inlet 105 for accepting a
person's breath and the distal end 102 comprises an outlet 110 for venting the
breath. A temperature sensor 2 is in fluid communication with the flowpath
120 of the breath passage 1. In addition, an alcohol sensor 3 is in fluid
communication with the fiowpath 120 of the breath passage 1. In an
exemplary embodiment, the temperature sensor 2 andlor alcohol sensor 3 are
physically contained within the fJowpath 120 of the breath passage 1 _ Since
the alcohol sensor 3 is in fluid communication with the flowpath 120, the need
for a mechanical pump or sampling system is eliminated.
In one exemplary embodiment, the temperature sensor 2 comprises a
thermistor sensor and the alcohol sensor 3 comprises an electrochemical fuel
cell with an ethanol sensor_ The temperature sensor 2 is in electrical
communication with two resistors 13 and 14. The resistor 14 is in electrical
7


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
communication with an electrical switch 15, which in turn is in electrical
communication with a computing device 4. The temperature sensor 2 is also
in electrical communication to an amplifier 10 for generating a signal
representative of flow rate. The output signal of the flow amplifier 10 is in
electrical communication with the analog-to~iigital converter 16, which
converts the output signal into a digital number that can be interpreted by
the
computing device 4, such as a microprocessor.
The alcohol sensor 3 is in electrical communication with an amplifier
11. The output signal of the amplifier is in electrical communication with the
analog-to-digital converter 16, which converts the output signal into a
digital
number_ The output signal of the analog-to-digital converter is connected to
the computing device 4.
A display 5, which in one exemplary embodiment comprises an
alphanumeric display, is driven by a display driver circuit 18. 'The display
driver circuit 18 is in electrical communication and is controlled by the
computing device 4. !n another exemplary embodiment, the present invention
further comprises a speaker 7, which is controlled by an amplifier 17, wherein
the amplifier is controlled by the computing device 4. A momentary switch 6
and a communication channel 8 are in electrical communication with the
computing device 4.
In one exemplary embodiment of the present invention depicted by
Figure 2, a breath test is initiated when a person depresses the switch 6
(step
305) of the personal breath tester 200. When the computing device 4
determines that the switch 6 has been depressed, the computing device 4
obtains the initial temperature of the temperature sensor 2 by opening the
8


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
switch 15, converting the temperature sensor 2 output signal into a digital
number with the analog-to-digital converter 16, and recording that number as
the starting value of the temperature sensor 2 (step 310). If the recorded
starting value of the temperature sensor 2 is less than 32 °C or
greater than
36 °C, the switch 15 is left open and the personal breath tester 200 is
ready to
begin testing breath samples. If the recorded starting value is equal to or
more than 32 °C and less than or equal to 36 °C (step 315), then
switch 15 is
turned on (closes circuit) by the computing device 4 (step 320) to increase
the
temperature level to that greater than expected human breath (i.e. 34
°C).
When switch 15 is turned on, the resistor 14 is placed in electrical
communication with the temperature sensor 2, causing a significant increase
in current to flow through the temperature sensor 2. After a short amount of
time, this causes heating of the temperature sensor 2, and the internal
temperature will rise significantly above 34 °C.
Once a suitable initial temperature has been obtained (i.e. less than 32
°C or greater than 36 °C), whether switch 15 is on or off, a
person blows into
the breath passage 1 of the personal breath detector 200_ The temperature of
the person's breath is Typically 34 °C. The stream of air blown into
the breath
passage will cause the temperature of the temperature sensor 2 to change.
1f the initial temperature of the temperature sensor 2 immediately
before blowing is below 32 °C, then the temperature will rise with
blowing.
Similarly, if the initial temperature of the temperature sensor 2 is above 36
°C,
then the temperature will fall with blowing.
This change in temperature is amplified by the flow amplifier 10,
converted into a digital signal by the analog-to-digital converter 16, and
then
9


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
sent to the computing device 4. The change in temperature is an indication
that the user is blowing, and the rate at which this temperature change occurs
is an indication of the flow rate (step 325). A quick change in temperature
indicates a higher flow rate than a slow change in temperature.
The computing device 4 calculates the flow rate (step 330) and
compares it to a minimum flow threshold value, which is stored in the
computing device or computer readable memory unit 160_ If the flow rate is
higher than the minimum (step 335), then the computing device 4 starts an
internal flow timer (step 345). While the person is blowing, the alcohol
sensor
output is continually checked to see if it peaks and then drops before blowing
stops {step 346). If it does peak, indicating the presence of exhaled
cigarette, cigar, or pipe smoke, then the computing device 4 aborts. the
breath
test (step 370), and sends a visual abort indication to the user. In one
exemplary embodiment, the abort indication is a visual indication on the
personal breath tester {i_e., such as a display 5). In another exemplary
embodiment, the abort indicator is an audible signal through a speaker 7. If
the alcohol sensor peaks, then another breath test must be initiated by the
person. Once the person stops blowing air into the breath passagE~ andlor the
air flow rate drops below the minimum threshold value (step 350), then the
computing device 4 records the flow timer value as an indication of how long
the person was blowing air into the breath passage at an acceptable rate {i.e.
above minimum threshold value) (step 355). if the recorded flow timer value
is less than a minimum timer threshold value (step 360), stored in the
computing device, then the computing device 4 aborts the breal:h test (step
370), and sends a visual abort indication to the user. In one exemplary


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
embodiment, the abort indication is a visual indication on the personal breath
tester (i.e., such as a display 5). In another exemplary embodiment, the abort
indicator is an audible signal through a speaker 7 (step 375). if the recorded
flow timer value is less than the minimum timer threshold another breath test
must be initiated by the person. The minimum flow rate and flow timer
threshold values exist to insure that the person taking the test is providing
a
minimum volume of deep-lung (alveolar) air into the device.
As long as the minimum flow rate and flow timer threshold values are
exceeded, the computing device 4 calculates the total breath volume by
integrating the breath flow rate over time (step 378). In one exemplary
embodiment, the fuel cell alcohol sensor sends a signal to the amplifier 11.
The amplifier 11 sends an amplified signal to the analog/digital converter 16.
The analog/digital converter 16 sends the digital signal to the computing
device 4. The computing device 4 then calculates an equivalent breath
alcohol level using a method incorporating the total breath volume and the
output signal of the fuel cell alcohol sensor. The breath alcohol level is
then
indicated on the display 5 as a digital number (step 385), along with an
audible indication on speaker 7 that the test is completed.
Another embodiment of the present invention, as illustrated in Fig. 3, is
a method for detecting gaseous component levels in a breath. The method
comprises: a breath being received through the breath channel (610). The
breath channel is in fluid communication with a flow rate sensor and an
electrochemical fuel cell gas sensor. The flow rate of the received breath is
measured (615). A first time is measured (620). The first time corresponds to
the amount of time elapsed while receiving the breath in the breath channel.
11


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
A current gaseous component level of the breath received in the breath
channel is calculated utilizing the flow rate, first time and an output from
the
gas sensor (630). In one exemplary embodiment, the gaseous component is
alcohol. In another exemplary embodiment, the flow rate sensor comprises a
pressure sensor. In an alternative embodiment, the flow rate sensor
comprises a temperature sensor.
In another embodiment of the present invention, calculating the current
gaseous component level further comprises calculating a volume of breath
received based on the flow rate and the first time.
In one exemplary embodiment, the method further comprises
measuring the flow rate at a plurality of time intervals and calculating the
volume of breath based on the plurality of flow rates and time intervals. For
example, in one embodiment, the flow rate may be measured from about
0_001 seconds to about 1 second. In another exemplary embodiment, the
flow rate is measured every 0.1 seconds and stored on the apparatus for later
retrieval when calculating the volume of breath received. In another
exemplary embodiment, the method further comprises measuring a second
time, wherein the second time corresponds to an elapsed time from the breath
being received in the breath channel to the time corresponding to the peak
output from the gas sensor. The second time can be utilized to further
enhance the calculation of the current gaseous component level.
In yet another exemplary embodiment illustrated in Fig. 4, the method further
comprises: measuring a peak output from the gas sensor {step 72Ei); and
determining if the peak output from the gas sensor has occurred while breath
is still being received in the breath channel (step 730)_ If breath is still
being
12


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
received and the peak output has occurred, the user is alerted of an .error
condition (step 735). In one exemplary embodiment, the determination of the
peak output comprises comparison of at least one prior measured gaseous
component level with the current measured gaseous component level_ For
example, if the current level is greater than the prior level, then the
current
level is saved as the peak output. This process continues until the current
level drops below the saved peak output, meaning that the peak level has
occurred. In another exemplary embodiment, the peak output is determined
by what is commonly known as a peak-and-hold circuit. This circuit has an
output that follows the gas sensor level as an input, but its output does not
drop when the gas sensor input drops. Thus the circuit retains the Freak gas
sensor level_
One skilled in the art will appreciate the various components of the
personal breath tester may be obtained from a multitude of sources known to
those skilled in the art. For example, ethanol fuel cell sensors may be
obtained from Guth Laboratories of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and from
Draeger Safety of Houston, Texas. Typical microprocessors that may be
utilized in the present invention may be obtained from Texas Instruments of
Dallas, Texas and NEC of Santa Clara, California. Temperature sensors
utilized in the present invention may be obtained from NtC of Melville, New
York and Murata of Smyrna, Georgia.
The foregoing description of the exemplary embodiments has been
presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to
be
exhaustive nor to limit the inventor to the precise form disclosed. Obvious
modifications or variations are possible in light of the above teachings. The
13


CA 02552130 2006-07-14
embodiments were chosen and described in order to best illustrate the
principles of the invention and its practical application to thereby Enable
one
of ordinary skill in the art to best utilize the invention in various
embodiments
and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use
contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the
claims appended hereto.
14

Representative Drawing
A single figure which represents the drawing illustrating the invention.
Administrative Status

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Administrative Status

Title Date
Forecasted Issue Date Unavailable
(22) Filed 2006-07-14
(41) Open to Public Inspection 2007-01-15
Examination Requested 2011-07-14
Dead Application 2016-12-01

Abandonment History

Abandonment Date Reason Reinstatement Date
2015-12-01 R30(2) - Failure to Respond
2016-07-14 FAILURE TO PAY APPLICATION MAINTENANCE FEE

Payment History

Fee Type Anniversary Year Due Date Amount Paid Paid Date
Registration of a document - section 124 $100.00 2006-07-14
Application Fee $200.00 2006-07-14
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 2 2008-07-14 $50.00 2008-07-14
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 3 2009-07-14 $50.00 2009-07-02
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 4 2010-07-14 $50.00 2010-06-22
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 5 2011-07-14 $100.00 2011-07-13
Request for Examination $400.00 2011-07-14
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 6 2012-07-16 $100.00 2012-07-11
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 7 2013-07-15 $100.00 2013-06-25
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 8 2014-07-14 $100.00 2014-06-18
Maintenance Fee - Application - New Act 9 2015-07-14 $100.00 2015-06-18
Owners on Record

Note: Records showing the ownership history in alphabetical order.

Current Owners on Record
OMEGAPOINT SYSTEMS, LLC
Past Owners on Record
GOLLAR, EDWARD
Past Owners that do not appear in the "Owners on Record" listing will appear in other documentation within the application.
Documents

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Document
Description 
Date
(yyyy-mm-dd) 
Number of pages   Size of Image (KB) 
Cover Page 2007-01-08 2 48
Abstract 2006-07-14 1 23
Description 2006-07-14 14 561
Claims 2006-07-14 7 182
Drawings 2006-07-14 4 66
Representative Drawing 2007-01-03 1 9
Description 2014-10-03 17 684
Claims 2014-10-03 7 190
Assignment 2006-07-14 5 180
Fees 2008-07-14 2 74
Correspondence 2008-07-14 2 74
Prosecution-Amendment 2011-07-14 1 66
Prosecution-Amendment 2011-09-20 1 31
Prosecution-Amendment 2014-04-07 5 275
Prosecution-Amendment 2015-06-01 4 312
Prosecution-Amendment 2014-10-03 19 752